Interaction between combustion-generated organic nanoparticles and biological systems: In vitro study of cell toxicity and apoptosis in human keratinocytes

Paola Pedata, Mariarosaria Boccellino, Raffaele La Porta, Maria Napolitano, Patrizia Minutolo, Lee A. Sgro, Francesca Zei, Nicola Sannolo, Lucio Quagliuolo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The purpose of this work was to evaluate the effect of flame-generated nucleation mode particles with an organic carbon structure on growth and apoptosis in immortalized human keratinocytes. In this study, cells were stimulated with nanoparticles collected from flames that produce only nucleation mode particles operating with a fuel:air mixture typical of low-emission combustion systems. Cytotoxicity as a function of particle concentration was monitored by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis, and apoptosis was observed by FACS using DNA fragmentation and hypodiploidism and confirmed by annexin assay. A dose-dependent reduction in cell viability by apoptosis in incubation periods of 48 and 72 hours was observed with a statistically significant increase in apoptosis over controls for a dose larger than 7 μg/mL (1.4 μg/cm2). The results presented here may be relevant for understanding the association between exposure to traffic-generated particulate pollution and enhanced skin aging reported in epidemiology studies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)338-352
Number of pages15
JournalNanotoxicology
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2012

Keywords

  • Apoptosis
  • Combustion-generated organic nanoparticles
  • Health effects
  • Skin toxicity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Toxicology

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