Interactions of bacterial pathogens with dendritic cells during invasion of mucosal surfaces

Francesca Granucci, Paola Ricciardi-Castagnoli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent studies of mucosal immunity suggest a key role for dendritic cells in the regulation of gut immune responses, in both physiological and pathological conditions. Dendritic cells are widely distributed in the lamina propria of the gut and are involved in direct bacterial uptake across mucosal surfaces, which questions the role of dendritic cells in innate mucosal responses. Approximately 400 commensal microbial species are present in the gut lumen. So how do dendritic cells distinguish pathogens from luminal microflora? Are the cytokines and chemokines induced in dendritic cells tailored to the class of microbes being recognized? Several very important questions still need to be addressed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)72-76
Number of pages5
JournalCurrent Opinion in Microbiology
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2003

Fingerprint

Dendritic Cells
Mucosal Immunity
Chemokines
Mucous Membrane
Cytokines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Microbiology

Cite this

Interactions of bacterial pathogens with dendritic cells during invasion of mucosal surfaces. / Granucci, Francesca; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola.

In: Current Opinion in Microbiology, Vol. 6, No. 1, 02.2003, p. 72-76.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Granucci, Francesca ; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola. / Interactions of bacterial pathogens with dendritic cells during invasion of mucosal surfaces. In: Current Opinion in Microbiology. 2003 ; Vol. 6, No. 1. pp. 72-76.
@article{bc2fcdb269804a6ab5df59e75e4c2edb,
title = "Interactions of bacterial pathogens with dendritic cells during invasion of mucosal surfaces",
abstract = "Recent studies of mucosal immunity suggest a key role for dendritic cells in the regulation of gut immune responses, in both physiological and pathological conditions. Dendritic cells are widely distributed in the lamina propria of the gut and are involved in direct bacterial uptake across mucosal surfaces, which questions the role of dendritic cells in innate mucosal responses. Approximately 400 commensal microbial species are present in the gut lumen. So how do dendritic cells distinguish pathogens from luminal microflora? Are the cytokines and chemokines induced in dendritic cells tailored to the class of microbes being recognized? Several very important questions still need to be addressed.",
author = "Francesca Granucci and Paola Ricciardi-Castagnoli",
year = "2003",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1016/S1369-5274(03)00007-9",
language = "English",
volume = "6",
pages = "72--76",
journal = "Current Opinion in Microbiology",
issn = "1369-5274",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Interactions of bacterial pathogens with dendritic cells during invasion of mucosal surfaces

AU - Granucci, Francesca

AU - Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola

PY - 2003/2

Y1 - 2003/2

N2 - Recent studies of mucosal immunity suggest a key role for dendritic cells in the regulation of gut immune responses, in both physiological and pathological conditions. Dendritic cells are widely distributed in the lamina propria of the gut and are involved in direct bacterial uptake across mucosal surfaces, which questions the role of dendritic cells in innate mucosal responses. Approximately 400 commensal microbial species are present in the gut lumen. So how do dendritic cells distinguish pathogens from luminal microflora? Are the cytokines and chemokines induced in dendritic cells tailored to the class of microbes being recognized? Several very important questions still need to be addressed.

AB - Recent studies of mucosal immunity suggest a key role for dendritic cells in the regulation of gut immune responses, in both physiological and pathological conditions. Dendritic cells are widely distributed in the lamina propria of the gut and are involved in direct bacterial uptake across mucosal surfaces, which questions the role of dendritic cells in innate mucosal responses. Approximately 400 commensal microbial species are present in the gut lumen. So how do dendritic cells distinguish pathogens from luminal microflora? Are the cytokines and chemokines induced in dendritic cells tailored to the class of microbes being recognized? Several very important questions still need to be addressed.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0037325009&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0037325009&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S1369-5274(03)00007-9

DO - 10.1016/S1369-5274(03)00007-9

M3 - Article

C2 - 12615223

AN - SCOPUS:0037325009

VL - 6

SP - 72

EP - 76

JO - Current Opinion in Microbiology

JF - Current Opinion in Microbiology

SN - 1369-5274

IS - 1

ER -