Interactions of single-wall carbon nanotubes with endothelial cells

Adriana Albini, Valentina Mussi, Alessandro Parodi, Agostina Ventura, Elisa Principi, Sara Tegami, Massimiliano Rocchia, Enrico Francheschi, Ilaria Sogno, Rosaria Cammarota, Giovanna Finzi, Fausto Sessa, Douglas McClain Noonan, Ugo Valbusa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) could be promising delivery vehicles for cancer therapy. These carriers are generally introduced intravenously, however, little is known of their interactions with endothelial cells, the cells lining vessels and mediating clearance of nanoparticles. Here we show that SWCNTs of 1 to 5 μm in length, both "pristine" and functionalized by oxidation, had limited toxicity for endothelial cells in vitro as determined by growth, migration morphogenesis, and survival assays. Endothelial cells transiently took up SWCNTs, and several lines of data indicated that they were associated with an enhanced acidic vesicle compartment within the endothelial cells. Our findings of SWCNT interactions with endothelial cells suggest these may be optimal vehicles for targeting the vasculature and potential carriers of anti-angiogenic drugs. The implications on their biological activity must be taken into account when considering the use of these nanoparticles for therapeutic delivery of drugs. From the Clinical Editor: Interactions of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with endothelial cells following IV administration remains unclear. Functionalized and naïve SWCNTs of 1-5 mm in length had limited toxicity to endothelial cells in vitro. Endothelial cells transiently took up SWCNTs and were associated with an enhanced acidic vesicle compartment within the cells. These findings suggest that SWCNTs may be promising vehicles for targeting the vasculature and potential carriers of anti-angiogenic drugs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)277-288
Number of pages12
JournalNanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology, and Medicine
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2010

Fingerprint

Carbon Nanotubes
Endothelial cells
Carbon nanotubes
Endothelial Cells
Angiogenesis Inhibitors
Nanoparticles
Toxicity
Therapeutic Uses
Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCN)
Bioactivity
Morphogenesis
Linings
Assays
Oxidation
Growth

Keywords

  • Angiogenesis
  • Endothelium
  • Nanoparticles
  • Nanotubes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Bioengineering
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Pharmaceutical Science

Cite this

Interactions of single-wall carbon nanotubes with endothelial cells. / Albini, Adriana; Mussi, Valentina; Parodi, Alessandro; Ventura, Agostina; Principi, Elisa; Tegami, Sara; Rocchia, Massimiliano; Francheschi, Enrico; Sogno, Ilaria; Cammarota, Rosaria; Finzi, Giovanna; Sessa, Fausto; Noonan, Douglas McClain; Valbusa, Ugo.

In: Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology, and Medicine, Vol. 6, No. 2, 04.2010, p. 277-288.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Albini, A, Mussi, V, Parodi, A, Ventura, A, Principi, E, Tegami, S, Rocchia, M, Francheschi, E, Sogno, I, Cammarota, R, Finzi, G, Sessa, F, Noonan, DM & Valbusa, U 2010, 'Interactions of single-wall carbon nanotubes with endothelial cells', Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology, and Medicine, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 277-288. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nano.2009.08.001
Albini, Adriana ; Mussi, Valentina ; Parodi, Alessandro ; Ventura, Agostina ; Principi, Elisa ; Tegami, Sara ; Rocchia, Massimiliano ; Francheschi, Enrico ; Sogno, Ilaria ; Cammarota, Rosaria ; Finzi, Giovanna ; Sessa, Fausto ; Noonan, Douglas McClain ; Valbusa, Ugo. / Interactions of single-wall carbon nanotubes with endothelial cells. In: Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology, and Medicine. 2010 ; Vol. 6, No. 2. pp. 277-288.
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