Interface dermatitis

Elvira Moscarella, Marina Agozzino, Claudia Cavallotti, Marco Ardigò

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The term interface dermatitis refers to those skin dermatoses in which an inflammatory process involves prevalently the dermo-epidermal junction, with injury and even necrosis of the basal cell keratinocytes. These dermatitis can be characterized further as being either vacuolar or showing lichenoid changes [1]. The most common interface dermatitis are characterized by prevalent lymphocytic interface infiltrate and are represented by two wide categories: cell-poor interface dermatitis, when only a sparse and focal infiltrate of inflammatory cells is present along the dermo-epidermal junction (erythema multiformis; autoimmune connective tissue disease, particularly systemic lupus erythematosus, dermatomyositis, and mixed connective tissue disease; graft-versus-host disease (GVHD); morbiliform viral exanthema; and some drug reactions), or cell rich, which typically occurs as a heavy band-like infiltrate that obscures the basal layers of the epidermis (lichen planus, lichenoid hypersensitivity reactions of drug or contact-based etiology, lichenoid reactions in the setting of hepatobiliary disease, secondary syphilis, and autoimmune CTD) [2].

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationReflectance Confocal Microscopy for Skin Diseases
PublisherSpringer Berlin Heidelberg
Pages391-400
Number of pages10
ISBN (Print)9783642219979, 9783642219962
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2012

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Dermatitis
Mixed Connective Tissue Disease
Drug Hypersensitivity
Lichen Planus
Connective Tissue Diseases
Dermatomyositis
Contact Dermatitis
Graft vs Host Disease
Erythema
Exanthema
Keratinocytes
Skin Diseases
Epidermis
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Necrosis
Skin
Wounds and Injuries
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Moscarella, E., Agozzino, M., Cavallotti, C., & Ardigò, M. (2012). Interface dermatitis. In Reflectance Confocal Microscopy for Skin Diseases (pp. 391-400). Springer Berlin Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-21997-9_29

Interface dermatitis. / Moscarella, Elvira; Agozzino, Marina; Cavallotti, Claudia; Ardigò, Marco.

Reflectance Confocal Microscopy for Skin Diseases. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2012. p. 391-400.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Moscarella, E, Agozzino, M, Cavallotti, C & Ardigò, M 2012, Interface dermatitis. in Reflectance Confocal Microscopy for Skin Diseases. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp. 391-400. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-21997-9_29
Moscarella E, Agozzino M, Cavallotti C, Ardigò M. Interface dermatitis. In Reflectance Confocal Microscopy for Skin Diseases. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. 2012. p. 391-400 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-21997-9_29
Moscarella, Elvira ; Agozzino, Marina ; Cavallotti, Claudia ; Ardigò, Marco. / Interface dermatitis. Reflectance Confocal Microscopy for Skin Diseases. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2012. pp. 391-400
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