Interventional programmes to improve cognition during healthy and pathological ageing: Cortical modulations and evidence for brain plasticity

Jesús Cespón, Carlo Miniussi, Maria Concetta Pellicciari

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A growing body of evidence suggests that healthy elderly individuals and patients with Alzheimer's disease retain an important potential for neuroplasticity. This review summarizes studies investigating the modulation of neural activity and structural brain integrity in response to interventions involving cognitive training, physical exercise and non-invasive brain stimulation in healthy elderly and cognitively impaired subjects (including patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease). Moreover, given the clinical relevance of neuroplasticity, we discuss how evidence for neuroplasticity can be inferred from the functional and structural brain changes observed after implementing these interventions. We emphasize that multimodal programmes, which combine several types of interventions, improve cognitive function to a greater extent than programmes that use a single interventional approach. We suggest specific methods for weighting the relative importance of cognitive training, physical exercise and non-invasive brain stimulation according to the functional and structural state of the brain of the targeted subject to maximize the cognitive improvements induced by multimodal programmes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)81-98
Number of pages18
JournalAgeing Research Reviews
Volume43
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1 2018

Fingerprint

Cognition
Plasticity
Brain
Aging of materials
Modulation
Neuronal Plasticity
Alzheimer Disease
Exercise

Keywords

  • Ageing
  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Cognitive reserve
  • Neuroplasticity
  • Non-pharmacological interventions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Biochemistry
  • Ageing
  • Molecular Biology
  • Neurology

Cite this

Interventional programmes to improve cognition during healthy and pathological ageing : Cortical modulations and evidence for brain plasticity. / Cespón, Jesús; Miniussi, Carlo; Pellicciari, Maria Concetta.

In: Ageing Research Reviews, Vol. 43, 01.05.2018, p. 81-98.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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