Intracranial ependymoma: Factors affecting outcome

Maura Massimino, Francesca R. Buttarelli, Manila Antonélli, Lorenza Gandola, Piergiorgio Modena, Felice Giangaspero

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ependymomas account for 2-9% of all neuroepithelial tumors, amounting to 6-12% of all intracranial tumors in children and up to 30% of those in children younger than 3 years. Recent findings provide evidence that intracranial and spinal ependymomas share similar molecular profiles with the radial glia of their corresponding locations. The management of intracranial ependymoma is still not optimal. The 5-year progression-free survival for children with ependymoma ranges between 30 and 50% with a worse progposis for patients with residual disease after surgery. The prognostic relevance of most factors are still being debated. Recent studies, in which the current WHO classification criteria were applied, reported the relationship between histological grade and outcome. Biomolecular studies have identified that gain of 1q25 and EGFR overexpression correlate to poor prognosis, whereas low expression of nucleolin correlated with a favorable outcome. Ependymomas have been considered a 'surgical disease', where completeness of excision can be reached in approximately half of the cases. At present the standard treatment is radiation therapy for all patients after gross-total or near-total resection. For high-risk patients, with residual tumor, an interesting, although experimental, approach could be chemotherapy followed by secondary surgery and postoperative conformal irradiation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)207-216
Number of pages10
JournalFuture Oncology
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Fingerprint

Ependymoma
Neuroepithelial Neoplasms
Residual Neoplasm
Neuroglia
Disease-Free Survival
Radiotherapy
Drug Therapy
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Chemotherapy
  • Ependymoma
  • Gliomas
  • Grading
  • Prognosis
  • Radiotherapy
  • Surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Intracranial ependymoma : Factors affecting outcome. / Massimino, Maura; Buttarelli, Francesca R.; Antonélli, Manila; Gandola, Lorenza; Modena, Piergiorgio; Giangaspero, Felice.

In: Future Oncology, Vol. 5, No. 2, 2009, p. 207-216.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Massimino, Maura ; Buttarelli, Francesca R. ; Antonélli, Manila ; Gandola, Lorenza ; Modena, Piergiorgio ; Giangaspero, Felice. / Intracranial ependymoma : Factors affecting outcome. In: Future Oncology. 2009 ; Vol. 5, No. 2. pp. 207-216.
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