Intracranial meningioma and concomitant cavernous malformation: A series description and review of the literature

Paolo Missori, Simone Peschillo, Angela Ambrosone, Stefano Martini, Emanuela Rastelli, Cristina Mancarella, Massimo Vigliotta, Sergio Paolini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Intracranial meningioma with concomitant cavernous malformation has been rarely described in the literature. This study aimed to investigate the correct neurosurgical conduct.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: We retrieved clinical and radiological data for 39 outpatients or patients that underwent surgery (mean age: 60 years; n = 25 females) for a single or multiple meningiomas and concomitant single or multiple cavernous malformations. Cavernous malformations were classified according to Zabramski's type scale. Our results were compared to results published in the literature.

RESULTS: All patients had at least one meningioma and at least one concomitant cavernous malformation. Most meningiomas and cavernous malformations were located in the supratentorial region. Nine patients (23 %) had multiple meningiomas and nine had concomitant multiple cavernous malformations. Cavernous malformations were classified as type I (n = 0), type II (n = 9), type III (n = 11), or type IV (n = 19). The surgical priority was meningioma removal. A single patient underwent simultaneous removal of a meningioma and a contiguous cavernous malformation. In the postoperative period and long term follow-up, no complications occurred related to cavernous malformations, intra- or extra-lesional bleeding, or morphology/size changes. Years after surgical treatment, a new type IV cavernous malformation occurred in two patients.

CONCLUSION: Our findings corroborate that meningioma removal should take priority in patients with intracranial meningioma and concomitant cavernous malformation. Concomitant cavernous malformations showed no change in morphology or size; therefore, they should merely be observed during follow-up. In patients that harbor a single meningioma, a type IV cavernous malformation should preferably be considered a concomitant cerebral microbleed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)106167
JournalClin. Neurol. Neurosurg.
Volume197
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2020

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