Intratibial injection of an anti-doxorubicin monoclonal antibody prevents drug-induced myelotoxicity in mice

D. Morelli, S. Ménard, S. Cazzaniga, M. I. Colnaghi, A. Balsari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

With few exceptions, the major limit to high-dose chemotherapeutic treatments is the severity and duration of drug-induced myelosuppression. We have recently developed a monoclonal antibody, MAD11, which reacts with the potent anti-tumour antibiotic doxorubicin and other anthracyclines. To protect directly pluripotent stem cells and cells of the haematopoietic microenvironment in the bone marrow against doxorubicin cytotoxicity, the monoclonal antibody MAD11 was injected into the tibial bone of mice before chemotherapeutic treatment. All mice pretreated intratibially with MAD11 and injected with 14 mg kg-1 body weight of doxorubicin survived, whereas 41% of mice treated with doxorubicin alone died. At a higher dose of doxorubicin (18 mg kg-1), early mortality (first 6 days) was similar in the groups, but no deaths were observed thereafter in the intratibially MAD11-treated group, whereas most of the mice treated with doxorubicin alone died. Data obtained in mice injected with P388 leukaemia cells showed that the intratibial injection of MAD11 did not compromise the anti-tumoral activity of doxorubicin. Moreover, the administration of the anti-doxorubicin monoclonal antibody before chemotherapeutic treatment effectively reduced apoptosis induced by doxorubicin in the bone marrow cells. These data suggest the usefulness of monoclonal antibodies against chemotherapeutic drugs in the local protection of bone marrow without influencing the anti-tumour properties of the drug.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)656-659
Number of pages4
JournalBritish Journal of Cancer
Volume75
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 1997

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Keywords

  • Anthracycline
  • Antidotal activity
  • Monoclonal antibody
  • Myelosuppression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

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