Involuntary switching into the native language induced by electrocortical stimulation of the superior temporal gyrus: A multimodal mapping study

Barbara Tomasino, Dario Marin, Cinzia Canderan, Marta Maieron, Riccardo Budai, Franco Fabbro, Miran Skrap

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We describe involuntary language switching from L2 to L1 evoked by electro-stimulation in the superior temporal gyrus in a 30-year-old right-handed Serbian (L1) speaker who was also a late Italian learner (L2). The patient underwent awake brain surgery. Stimulation of other portions of the exposed cortex did not cause language switching as did not stimulation of the left inferior frontal gyrus, where we evoked a speech arrest. Stimulation effects on language switching were selective, namely, interfered with counting behaviour but not with object naming. The coordinates of the positive site were combined with functional and fibre tracking (DTI) data. Results showed that the language switching site belonged to a significant fMRI cluster in the left superior temporal gyrus/supramarginal gyrus found activated for both L1 and L2, and for both the patient and controls, and did not overlap with the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF), the inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF) and the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF). This area, also known as Stp, has a role in phonological processing.Language switching phenomenon we observed can be partly explained by transient dysfunction of the feed-forward control mechanism hypothesized by the DIVA (Directions Into Velocities of Articulators) model (Golfinopoulos, E., Tourville, J. A., & Guenther, F. H. (2010). The integration of large-scale neural network modeling and functional brain imaging in speech motor control. NeuroImage, 52, 862-874).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)87-100
Number of pages14
JournalNeuropsychologia
Volume62
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Keywords

  • Awake surgery
  • FMRI
  • L2 learner
  • Language switching
  • Multimodal mapping
  • Superior temporal gyrus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Medicine(all)

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