Iodine-131-MIBG imaging to monitor chemotherapy response in advanced neuroblastoma: Comparison with laboratory analysis

S. Maurea, S. Lastoria, C. Caraco, P. Indolfi, F. Casale, M. T. Di Tullio, M. Salvatore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The rationale of this study was the evaluation of response to chemotherapy in children with advanced neuroblastoma using currently available diagnostic modalities. Methods: Iodine-131-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging and 24-hr urinary vanillylmandelic acid (VMA) measurement were evaluated in 14 patients (7 males, 7 females, age range: 2-68 mo) with advanced neuroblastoma both pre- and postchemotherapy (5.6 ± 2.8 mo) as well as serum ferritin (FER) and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) levels in 9 and 8 patients, respectively. MIBG images were qualitatively compared in each patient. Results: Prechemotherapy, a total of 39 abnormal foci of MIBG uptake was detected. Postchemotherapy, 15 of these showed unchanged MIBG uptake, 7 had decreased uptake and 17 showed no uptake. In addition, four new abnormal foci of uptake were found. Postchemotherapy, a significant reduction of abnormal MIBG uptake (p <0.01) was observed using a lesion-by-lesion analysis. When biochemical and MIBG postchemotherapy changes were compared, a significant relationship was found only between MIBG and VMA results (r = 0.84, p <0.01). Conclusions: In postchemotherapy follow-up of children with advanced neuroblastoma, laboratory evaluation using VMA, FER and NSE measurements reflect only the global functional status of the disease, and are not helpful in defining the response of individual tumor lesions to treatment. Conversely, qualitative analysis using MIBG imaging may allow lesion-by- lesion evaluation of the heterogeneity of neuroblastoma response to chemotherapy. In this setting, changes in MIBG uptake are mirrored by the changes in catecholamine production, as measured by VMA levels.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1429-1435
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Nuclear Medicine
Volume35
Issue number9
Publication statusPublished - 1994

Fingerprint

Vanilmandelic Acid
Neuroblastoma
Iodine
Drug Therapy
Phosphopyruvate Hydratase
Ferritins
Catecholamines
Serum
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • chemotherapy
  • laboratory tests
  • MIBG imaging
  • neuroblastoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Iodine-131-MIBG imaging to monitor chemotherapy response in advanced neuroblastoma : Comparison with laboratory analysis. / Maurea, S.; Lastoria, S.; Caraco, C.; Indolfi, P.; Casale, F.; Di Tullio, M. T.; Salvatore, M.

In: Journal of Nuclear Medicine, Vol. 35, No. 9, 1994, p. 1429-1435.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{ff7d7450c03844a9bf48f75653288055,
title = "Iodine-131-MIBG imaging to monitor chemotherapy response in advanced neuroblastoma: Comparison with laboratory analysis",
abstract = "The rationale of this study was the evaluation of response to chemotherapy in children with advanced neuroblastoma using currently available diagnostic modalities. Methods: Iodine-131-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging and 24-hr urinary vanillylmandelic acid (VMA) measurement were evaluated in 14 patients (7 males, 7 females, age range: 2-68 mo) with advanced neuroblastoma both pre- and postchemotherapy (5.6 ± 2.8 mo) as well as serum ferritin (FER) and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) levels in 9 and 8 patients, respectively. MIBG images were qualitatively compared in each patient. Results: Prechemotherapy, a total of 39 abnormal foci of MIBG uptake was detected. Postchemotherapy, 15 of these showed unchanged MIBG uptake, 7 had decreased uptake and 17 showed no uptake. In addition, four new abnormal foci of uptake were found. Postchemotherapy, a significant reduction of abnormal MIBG uptake (p <0.01) was observed using a lesion-by-lesion analysis. When biochemical and MIBG postchemotherapy changes were compared, a significant relationship was found only between MIBG and VMA results (r = 0.84, p <0.01). Conclusions: In postchemotherapy follow-up of children with advanced neuroblastoma, laboratory evaluation using VMA, FER and NSE measurements reflect only the global functional status of the disease, and are not helpful in defining the response of individual tumor lesions to treatment. Conversely, qualitative analysis using MIBG imaging may allow lesion-by- lesion evaluation of the heterogeneity of neuroblastoma response to chemotherapy. In this setting, changes in MIBG uptake are mirrored by the changes in catecholamine production, as measured by VMA levels.",
keywords = "chemotherapy, laboratory tests, MIBG imaging, neuroblastoma",
author = "S. Maurea and S. Lastoria and C. Caraco and P. Indolfi and F. Casale and {Di Tullio}, {M. T.} and M. Salvatore",
year = "1994",
language = "English",
volume = "35",
pages = "1429--1435",
journal = "Journal of Nuclear Medicine",
issn = "0161-5505",
publisher = "Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc.",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Iodine-131-MIBG imaging to monitor chemotherapy response in advanced neuroblastoma

T2 - Comparison with laboratory analysis

AU - Maurea, S.

AU - Lastoria, S.

AU - Caraco, C.

AU - Indolfi, P.

AU - Casale, F.

AU - Di Tullio, M. T.

AU - Salvatore, M.

PY - 1994

Y1 - 1994

N2 - The rationale of this study was the evaluation of response to chemotherapy in children with advanced neuroblastoma using currently available diagnostic modalities. Methods: Iodine-131-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging and 24-hr urinary vanillylmandelic acid (VMA) measurement were evaluated in 14 patients (7 males, 7 females, age range: 2-68 mo) with advanced neuroblastoma both pre- and postchemotherapy (5.6 ± 2.8 mo) as well as serum ferritin (FER) and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) levels in 9 and 8 patients, respectively. MIBG images were qualitatively compared in each patient. Results: Prechemotherapy, a total of 39 abnormal foci of MIBG uptake was detected. Postchemotherapy, 15 of these showed unchanged MIBG uptake, 7 had decreased uptake and 17 showed no uptake. In addition, four new abnormal foci of uptake were found. Postchemotherapy, a significant reduction of abnormal MIBG uptake (p <0.01) was observed using a lesion-by-lesion analysis. When biochemical and MIBG postchemotherapy changes were compared, a significant relationship was found only between MIBG and VMA results (r = 0.84, p <0.01). Conclusions: In postchemotherapy follow-up of children with advanced neuroblastoma, laboratory evaluation using VMA, FER and NSE measurements reflect only the global functional status of the disease, and are not helpful in defining the response of individual tumor lesions to treatment. Conversely, qualitative analysis using MIBG imaging may allow lesion-by- lesion evaluation of the heterogeneity of neuroblastoma response to chemotherapy. In this setting, changes in MIBG uptake are mirrored by the changes in catecholamine production, as measured by VMA levels.

AB - The rationale of this study was the evaluation of response to chemotherapy in children with advanced neuroblastoma using currently available diagnostic modalities. Methods: Iodine-131-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging and 24-hr urinary vanillylmandelic acid (VMA) measurement were evaluated in 14 patients (7 males, 7 females, age range: 2-68 mo) with advanced neuroblastoma both pre- and postchemotherapy (5.6 ± 2.8 mo) as well as serum ferritin (FER) and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) levels in 9 and 8 patients, respectively. MIBG images were qualitatively compared in each patient. Results: Prechemotherapy, a total of 39 abnormal foci of MIBG uptake was detected. Postchemotherapy, 15 of these showed unchanged MIBG uptake, 7 had decreased uptake and 17 showed no uptake. In addition, four new abnormal foci of uptake were found. Postchemotherapy, a significant reduction of abnormal MIBG uptake (p <0.01) was observed using a lesion-by-lesion analysis. When biochemical and MIBG postchemotherapy changes were compared, a significant relationship was found only between MIBG and VMA results (r = 0.84, p <0.01). Conclusions: In postchemotherapy follow-up of children with advanced neuroblastoma, laboratory evaluation using VMA, FER and NSE measurements reflect only the global functional status of the disease, and are not helpful in defining the response of individual tumor lesions to treatment. Conversely, qualitative analysis using MIBG imaging may allow lesion-by- lesion evaluation of the heterogeneity of neuroblastoma response to chemotherapy. In this setting, changes in MIBG uptake are mirrored by the changes in catecholamine production, as measured by VMA levels.

KW - chemotherapy

KW - laboratory tests

KW - MIBG imaging

KW - neuroblastoma

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028003630&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028003630&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 8071687

AN - SCOPUS:0028003630

VL - 35

SP - 1429

EP - 1435

JO - Journal of Nuclear Medicine

JF - Journal of Nuclear Medicine

SN - 0161-5505

IS - 9

ER -