Is refractory epilepsy preventable?

Santiago Arroyo, Martin J. Brodie, Giuliano Avanzini, Christoph Baumgartner, Catherine Chiron, Olivier Dulac, Jacqueline A. French, José M. Serratosa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

75 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

About a third of the patients diagnosed with epilepsy will not be fully controlled with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), and many of them will have frequent and disabling seizures. These patients will undergo multiple drug trials, most often without complete seizure remission. Moreover, refractory epilepsy is associated with increased morbidity (from seizures and medications), social isolation, unemployment, and overall reduced quality of life. There is evidence that refractory epilepsy can be a progressive disorder, which, if controlled early, might never develop into a full syndrome with all of its associated sequelae. The difficulty lies in identifying at an early stage patients who are likely to progress to intractability. No currently known markers enable clinicians to make this identification with confidence. Advances in pharmacogenomics and our understanding of pharmacologic responsiveness in epilepsy may change this situation. Even now, we are able to identify many patients with a poor prognosis earlier than before, particularly in the pediatric population, in which syndromic classification may provide an approach to predict intractability. The early initiation of aggressive therapy may improve outcome and overall quality of life.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)437-444
Number of pages8
JournalEpilepsia
Volume43
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Epilepsy
Seizures
Quality of Life
Social Isolation
Unemployment
Pharmacogenetics
Anticonvulsants
Pediatrics
Morbidity
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Population
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Anticonvulsants
  • Epilepsy surgery
  • Epileptogenesis
  • Refractory epilepsy
  • Seizures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Arroyo, S., Brodie, M. J., Avanzini, G., Baumgartner, C., Chiron, C., Dulac, O., ... Serratosa, J. M. (2002). Is refractory epilepsy preventable? Epilepsia, 43(4), 437-444. https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1528-1157.2002.38501.x

Is refractory epilepsy preventable? / Arroyo, Santiago; Brodie, Martin J.; Avanzini, Giuliano; Baumgartner, Christoph; Chiron, Catherine; Dulac, Olivier; French, Jacqueline A.; Serratosa, José M.

In: Epilepsia, Vol. 43, No. 4, 2002, p. 437-444.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Arroyo, S, Brodie, MJ, Avanzini, G, Baumgartner, C, Chiron, C, Dulac, O, French, JA & Serratosa, JM 2002, 'Is refractory epilepsy preventable?', Epilepsia, vol. 43, no. 4, pp. 437-444. https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1528-1157.2002.38501.x
Arroyo S, Brodie MJ, Avanzini G, Baumgartner C, Chiron C, Dulac O et al. Is refractory epilepsy preventable? Epilepsia. 2002;43(4):437-444. https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1528-1157.2002.38501.x
Arroyo, Santiago ; Brodie, Martin J. ; Avanzini, Giuliano ; Baumgartner, Christoph ; Chiron, Catherine ; Dulac, Olivier ; French, Jacqueline A. ; Serratosa, José M. / Is refractory epilepsy preventable?. In: Epilepsia. 2002 ; Vol. 43, No. 4. pp. 437-444.
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