Is the estimation of human age derived from ambulatory blood pressure waveform analysis stable over the 24 hours?

Andriana Prentza, Ben Pm Imholz, Paolo Gizdulich, Gianfranco Parati, Karel H. Wesseling

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

In a previous study we developed a method to estimate a person's age based on 10 s episodes of arterial pressure pulsations using a neural net technique. The pulsations were recorded in the morning in supine or semi-reclining position in rest. We wondered if the age estimation techniques would produce systematically different values under ambulatory conditions, during night or day, in other postures, over the 24 hours. We, therefore, analyzed 10 s episodes each half hour over the 24 hours in 12 previously recorded persons aged 19 to 58 years, applying the waveforms to the same neural net as previously developed. We pre-pared averages over the 24 hours, over the day, the night, the morning, and the siesta and compared them to calendar age of the persons. We found no systematic differences between the various estimates and with calendar age. We conclude that neural net estimation of a person's age based on his arterial pulse is stable during the 24 hours.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationStudies in Health Technology and Informatics
Pages153-158
Number of pages6
Volume60
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999

Fingerprint

Waveform analysis
Blood pressure
Blood Pressure
Neural networks
Posture
Arterial Pressure
Calendars

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Health Informatics
  • Health Information Management

Cite this

Prentza, A., Imholz, B. P., Gizdulich, P., Parati, G., & Wesseling, K. H. (1999). Is the estimation of human age derived from ambulatory blood pressure waveform analysis stable over the 24 hours? In Studies in Health Technology and Informatics (Vol. 60, pp. 153-158) https://doi.org/10.3233/978-1-60750-904-2-153

Is the estimation of human age derived from ambulatory blood pressure waveform analysis stable over the 24 hours? / Prentza, Andriana; Imholz, Ben Pm; Gizdulich, Paolo; Parati, Gianfranco; Wesseling, Karel H.

Studies in Health Technology and Informatics. Vol. 60 1999. p. 153-158.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Prentza, A, Imholz, BP, Gizdulich, P, Parati, G & Wesseling, KH 1999, Is the estimation of human age derived from ambulatory blood pressure waveform analysis stable over the 24 hours? in Studies in Health Technology and Informatics. vol. 60, pp. 153-158. https://doi.org/10.3233/978-1-60750-904-2-153
Prentza A, Imholz BP, Gizdulich P, Parati G, Wesseling KH. Is the estimation of human age derived from ambulatory blood pressure waveform analysis stable over the 24 hours? In Studies in Health Technology and Informatics. Vol. 60. 1999. p. 153-158 https://doi.org/10.3233/978-1-60750-904-2-153
Prentza, Andriana ; Imholz, Ben Pm ; Gizdulich, Paolo ; Parati, Gianfranco ; Wesseling, Karel H. / Is the estimation of human age derived from ambulatory blood pressure waveform analysis stable over the 24 hours?. Studies in Health Technology and Informatics. Vol. 60 1999. pp. 153-158
@inbook{fa69358b158e47359dbcee57f3702d54,
title = "Is the estimation of human age derived from ambulatory blood pressure waveform analysis stable over the 24 hours?",
abstract = "In a previous study we developed a method to estimate a person's age based on 10 s episodes of arterial pressure pulsations using a neural net technique. The pulsations were recorded in the morning in supine or semi-reclining position in rest. We wondered if the age estimation techniques would produce systematically different values under ambulatory conditions, during night or day, in other postures, over the 24 hours. We, therefore, analyzed 10 s episodes each half hour over the 24 hours in 12 previously recorded persons aged 19 to 58 years, applying the waveforms to the same neural net as previously developed. We pre-pared averages over the 24 hours, over the day, the night, the morning, and the siesta and compared them to calendar age of the persons. We found no systematic differences between the various estimates and with calendar age. We conclude that neural net estimation of a person's age based on his arterial pulse is stable during the 24 hours.",
author = "Andriana Prentza and Imholz, {Ben Pm} and Paolo Gizdulich and Gianfranco Parati and Wesseling, {Karel H.}",
year = "1999",
doi = "10.3233/978-1-60750-904-2-153",
language = "English",
volume = "60",
pages = "153--158",
booktitle = "Studies in Health Technology and Informatics",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Is the estimation of human age derived from ambulatory blood pressure waveform analysis stable over the 24 hours?

AU - Prentza, Andriana

AU - Imholz, Ben Pm

AU - Gizdulich, Paolo

AU - Parati, Gianfranco

AU - Wesseling, Karel H.

PY - 1999

Y1 - 1999

N2 - In a previous study we developed a method to estimate a person's age based on 10 s episodes of arterial pressure pulsations using a neural net technique. The pulsations were recorded in the morning in supine or semi-reclining position in rest. We wondered if the age estimation techniques would produce systematically different values under ambulatory conditions, during night or day, in other postures, over the 24 hours. We, therefore, analyzed 10 s episodes each half hour over the 24 hours in 12 previously recorded persons aged 19 to 58 years, applying the waveforms to the same neural net as previously developed. We pre-pared averages over the 24 hours, over the day, the night, the morning, and the siesta and compared them to calendar age of the persons. We found no systematic differences between the various estimates and with calendar age. We conclude that neural net estimation of a person's age based on his arterial pulse is stable during the 24 hours.

AB - In a previous study we developed a method to estimate a person's age based on 10 s episodes of arterial pressure pulsations using a neural net technique. The pulsations were recorded in the morning in supine or semi-reclining position in rest. We wondered if the age estimation techniques would produce systematically different values under ambulatory conditions, during night or day, in other postures, over the 24 hours. We, therefore, analyzed 10 s episodes each half hour over the 24 hours in 12 previously recorded persons aged 19 to 58 years, applying the waveforms to the same neural net as previously developed. We pre-pared averages over the 24 hours, over the day, the night, the morning, and the siesta and compared them to calendar age of the persons. We found no systematic differences between the various estimates and with calendar age. We conclude that neural net estimation of a person's age based on his arterial pulse is stable during the 24 hours.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84887099096&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84887099096&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3233/978-1-60750-904-2-153

DO - 10.3233/978-1-60750-904-2-153

M3 - Chapter

AN - SCOPUS:84887099096

VL - 60

SP - 153

EP - 158

BT - Studies in Health Technology and Informatics

ER -