Is there a difference in phenotype between males and females with non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia? A cross-sectional evaluation

Maria Marsella, Massimiliano Ammirabile, Tiziana Di Matola, Alessia Pepe, Silvia Costantini, Aldo Filosa, Paolo Ricchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: Non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia includes a variety of phenotypes and genotypes that rarely require regular transfusions. However, these patients can experience a wide range of complications. The objective of this retrospective study was to verify whether there is a significant difference in non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia-related complications and treatment among males and females. Methods: We performed a re-analysis of samples evaluated in a previously published cross-sectional study, regarding 96 non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia patients followed at the ‘UOSD Malattie Rare del Globulo Rosso’ Centre of the Cardarelli Hospital in Naples, Italy. Results: We found that females were more anemic than males, but there was no significant difference in prevalence of common complications among genders, except for hypogonadism. Furthermore, the transitory regular transfusions regimen in women who had been pregnant does not seem to have a significant impact on overall prognosis. Discussion: In non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia patients, the lower levels of hemoglobin found in females do not seem to indicate a higher prevalence of complications. Conclusion: This data should be considered in studies with experimental treatments aiming to correct anemia in patients with non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia. It should probably also be taken into account in order to set up different transfusion regimens among genders in transfusion-dependent patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-4
Number of pages4
JournalHematology
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Jan 5 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • gender medicine
  • genotype
  • iron overload
  • phenotype
  • pregnancy
  • severity
  • Thalassemia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

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