KIBRA T allele influences memory performance and progression of cognitive decline: a 7-year follow-up study in subjective cognitive decline and mild cognitive impairment

Salvatore Mazzeo, Valentina Bessi, Sonia Padiglioni, Silvia Bagnoli, Laura Bracco, Sandro Sorbi, Benedetta Nacmias

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

KIBRA is a signal transducer protein, mainly expressed in the kidney and brain. A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs17070145, T → C exchange) has been linked to different cognitive function. In 2008, we studied 70 subjects who complained of subjective cognitive decline (SCD) and found that CT/TT carriers performed worse than CC carriers on a long-term memory test. We followed up the 70 SCD subjects and also 31 subjects affected by mild cognitive impairment (MCI) for a mean follow-up time of 7 years, during which 16 SCD subjects progressed to MCI and 14 MCI subjects progressed to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Carrying the T allele was associated with MCI and with a two times-higher risk of developing MCI than CC carriers. In the SCD sample, CT/TT carriers showed a greater worsening on Rivermead Behavioral Memory Test (RBMT) compared to CC carriers. In the MCI sample, CT/TT carriers performed worse than CC carriers on RBMT. There is a lack of consensus on the effect of KIBRA gene variants on cognitive performances in episodic memory and on the risk of AD. Our results confirm a role of T allele on progression of cognitive decline.

Original languageEnglish
JournalNeurological Sciences
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 11 2019

Keywords

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • ApoE
  • KIBRA
  • Mild cognitive impairment
  • Neuropsychology
  • Subjective cognitive decline

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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