Killer Ig-like receptor-mediated control of natural killer cell alloreactivity in haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

Lorenzo Moretta, Franco Locatelli, Daniela Pende, Emanuela Marcenaro, Maria Cristina Mingari, Alessandro Moretta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

147 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Natural killer (NK) cells are key members of the innate immune system. In a self-environment, they sense and kill target cells lacking major histocompatibility complex class I molecules and release various cytokines on activation. The discovery of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I specific inhibitory receptors (including the allotype-specific killer immunoglobulin-like receptors), and of various activating receptors and their ligands, provided the basis for understanding the molecular mechanism of NK-cell activation and function, mainly resulting from the balance between activating and inhibitory signals. In an allogeneic setting, such as T cell-depleted haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, NK cells may express inhibitory killer immunoglobulin-like receptors that are not engaged by any of the HLA class I alleles present on allogeneic cells. Such "alloreactive" NK cells greatly contribute both to eradication of leukemia blasts escaping the preparative regimen and to clearance of residual host dendritic cells and T lymphocytes (thus preventing graft-versus-host disease and graft rejection, respectively). Improved prevention of graft-versus-host disease might be achieved by redirecting to lymph nodes adoptively transferred, alloreactive NK cells by inducing CCR7-uptake in vitro. Recent studies suggested that, after immune-suppressive therapy, alloreactive NK cells from an HLA-haploidentical donor may prevent leukemia recurrence also in patients who have not received allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)764-771
Number of pages8
JournalBlood
Volume117
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 20 2011

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Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
HLA Antigens
Stem cells
Grafts
Natural Killer Cells
KIR Receptors
T-cells
Chemical activation
Immune system
Graft vs Host Disease
Leukemia
Cytokines
Ligands
T-Lymphocytes
Molecules
Graft Rejection
Major Histocompatibility Complex
Dendritic Cells
Immune System
Lymph Nodes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Immunology

Cite this

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AU - Moretta, Lorenzo

AU - Locatelli, Franco

AU - Pende, Daniela

AU - Marcenaro, Emanuela

AU - Mingari, Maria Cristina

AU - Moretta, Alessandro

PY - 2011/1/20

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