Knee rotationplasty: motion of the body centre of mass during walking

Viviana Rota, Maria Grazia Benedetti, Yusuke Okita, Marco Manfrini, Luigi Tesio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Knee rotationplasty (KRP) is a type of surgery in which the rotated ankle serves as a new knee after being removed for bone tumor. Although this limb salvage surgery is rarely indicated in properly selected patients, it may offer functional advantages over transfemoral amputation, and more durable results compared with a prosthesis. The walking mechanics of adult patients after KRP is believed to be close to that of below-knee amputees. In this study, we evaluated steady-state walking of KRP patients from the viewpoint of the overall muscle power needed to keep the body centre of mass in motion. Three adult patients after KRP, all athletes, were evaluated. Ground reactions during walking were recorded during six subsequent strides on a force treadmill. The positive mechanical work and power sustaining the motion of the centre of mass and the recovery of muscle energy due to the pendulum-like mechanism of walking were computed and compared with those obtained in previous studies from above-knee, below-knee amputees and healthy individuals. In KRP patients, walking was sustained by a muscle power output which was 1.4–3.6 times lower during the step performed on the rotated limb than on the subsequent step. The recovery of muscle energy was slightly lower (0.9) or higher (1.3–1.4 times) on the affected side. In two out of the three KRP patients, our findings were more similar to those from above-knee amputees than to those from below-knee amputees. After KRP, the rotated limb does not necessarily provide the same power provided by below-knee amputation. This may have a relevance for the paralympic classification of KRP athletes.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Rehabilitation Research
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Sep 28 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

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