Knockout of the Arp2/3 complex in epidermis causes a psoriasis-like disease hallmarked by hyperactivation of transcription factor Nrf2

Rob van der Kammen, Ji Ying Song, Iris de Rink, Hans Janssen, Stefania Madonna, Claudia Scarponi, Cristina Albanesi, Wim Brugman, Metello Innocenti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The Arp2/3 complex assembles branched actin filaments, which are key to many cellular processes, but its organismal roles remain poorly understood. Here, we employed conditional Arpc4 knockout mice to study the function of the Arp2/3 complex in the epidermis. We found that depletion of the Arp2/3 complex by knockout of Arpc4 results in skin abnormalities at birth that evolve into a severe psoriasis-like disease hallmarked by hyperactivation of transcription factor Nrf2. Knockout of Arpc4 in cultured keratinocytes was sufficient to induce nuclear accumulation of Nrf2, upregulation of Nrf2 target genes and decreased filamentous actin levels. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of the Arp2/3 complex unmasked the role of branched actin filaments in Nrf2 regulation. Consistent with this, we revealed that Nrf2 associates with the actin cytoskeleton in cells and binds to filamentous actin in vitro. Finally, we discovered that Arpc4 is downregulated in both human and mouse psoriatic epidermis. Thus, the Arp2/3 complex affects keratinocyte shape and transcriptome through an actin-based cell-autonomous mechanism that influences epidermal morphogenesis and homeostasis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4588-4603
Number of pages16
JournalDevelopment (Cambridge)
Volume144
Issue number24
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 15 2017

Keywords

  • Actin
  • Arp2/3 complex
  • Epidermis
  • Human
  • Mouse
  • Nfe2l2
  • Nrf2
  • Psoriasis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Developmental Biology

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