Knowledge of HPV infection and vaccination among vaccinated and unvaccinated teenaged girls

Francesco Sopracordevole, Federica Cigolot, Francesca Mancioli, Alberto Agarossi, Fausto Boselli, Andrea Ciavattini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective To assess the knowledge of teenaged girls on human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and vaccination 12 months after the start of a vaccine administration and information campaign. Methods Between May 15 and June 15, 2009, an anonymous questionnaire was given to 629 girls attending a secondary school in a northeastern Italian city (286 were vaccinated against HPV, 343 were unvaccinated) to investigate their knowledge on HPV infection, transmission, prevention, vaccination, and post-vaccination behaviors. The responses were evaluated with respect to the vaccination status of the participants. Results Vaccinated teenaged girls had no more knowledge than unvaccinated ones about the route of HPV transmission, and the relationship between HPV and AIDS. Vaccinated girls had less knowledge than unvaccinated girls about preventing transmission by condom (P = 0.003) and about the correlation between HPV and penile cancer (P = 0.034) and warts (P = 0.001). Furthermore, compared with unvaccinated girls, more vaccinated girls believed that contraceptive pills might prevent HPV-related disease (P = 0.001). Vaccinated girls better understood the importance of performing regular Pap smears after vaccination (P = 0.021). Conclusion Knowledge on HPV infection and vaccination remains suboptimal, especially among vaccinated teenaged girls, despite a broad information campaign. Misconceptions about the utility of secondary prevention may increase risky sexual behaviors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)48-51
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics
Volume122
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2013

Fingerprint

Papillomavirus Infections
Vaccination
Penile Neoplasms
Papanicolaou Test
Warts
Infectious Disease Transmission
Condoms
Contraceptive Agents
Secondary Prevention
Sexual Behavior
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Vaccines

Keywords

  • Cervical cancer
  • HPV infection
  • Sexually transmitted diseases
  • Teenaged girls
  • Vaccination against HPV

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Cite this

Knowledge of HPV infection and vaccination among vaccinated and unvaccinated teenaged girls. / Sopracordevole, Francesco; Cigolot, Federica; Mancioli, Francesca; Agarossi, Alberto; Boselli, Fausto; Ciavattini, Andrea.

In: International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Vol. 122, No. 1, 07.2013, p. 48-51.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sopracordevole, Francesco ; Cigolot, Federica ; Mancioli, Francesca ; Agarossi, Alberto ; Boselli, Fausto ; Ciavattini, Andrea. / Knowledge of HPV infection and vaccination among vaccinated and unvaccinated teenaged girls. In: International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics. 2013 ; Vol. 122, No. 1. pp. 48-51.
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