Laboratory findings in Zika infection: The experience of a reference centre in North-West Italy

Elisa Burdino, Maria Grazia Milia, Tiziano Allice, Gabriella Gregori, Tina Ruggiero, Guido Calleri, Filippo Lipani, Anna Lucchini, Giulietta Venturi, Giovanni Di Perri, Valeria Ghisetti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Zika virus (ZIKV) remains a public health concern due to its association with fetal malformation and neurologic disease. Objective: To report a reference centre experience on ZIKA virus (ZIKV) infection in travelers from epidemic countries from January 1 to September, 30, 2016 in Italy North-West (a geographic area covering 4.424 million inhabitants, corresponding to almost 73% of Italy North-West area). Study design: One hundred and twelve febrile travelers were studied to rule out a tropical fever [e.g. malaria, dengue (DENV), chikungunya (CHIKV), West Nile (WNV) and ZIKV]. Molecular tests for detecting ZIKV RNA were applied on serum or urine as well as IgG and IgM specific serology. Results: ZIKV was the most frequent “tropical infection (11.6%) with 12 infected travelers and one sexual partner of an infected traveler. At the time of the diagnosis, ZIKV RNA was detected in the blood from 9 patients (69%) within 7 days from symptom onset; afterwards, the virus was detected only in urine (5 patients) and ZIKV IgM was reactive in 9 patients (69%). Travelers with ZIKV infection tested negative for DENV, CHIKV, WNV and malaria and completely recovered. Other infections identified in travelers were DENV (5 patients, 4.5%), CHIKV (1, 0.9%), malaria (Plasmodium vivax, 1, 0.9%), measles (1, 0.9%) and tuberculosis (1, 0.9%). Conclusions: The etiologic diagnosis of a febrile illness in travelers where ZIKV is endemic is highly desirable as they are sentinel of a challenging epidemiology including the risk of autochthonous transmission in non endemic countries where the competent or carrier vector is present.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)18-22
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Virology
Volume101
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1 2018

Fingerprint

Italy
Infection
Fever
Malaria
Immunoglobulin M
Urine
RNA
Vivax Malaria
Fetal Diseases
West Nile virus
Infectious Disease Transmission
Dengue
Sexual Partners
Measles
Virus Diseases
Serology
Zika Virus
Nervous System Diseases
Epidemiology
Tuberculosis

Keywords

  • Blood
  • Real time RT-PCR
  • Travelers
  • Urine
  • Zika virus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Burdino, E., Milia, M. G., Allice, T., Gregori, G., Ruggiero, T., Calleri, G., ... Ghisetti, V. (2018). Laboratory findings in Zika infection: The experience of a reference centre in North-West Italy. Journal of Clinical Virology, 101, 18-22. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcv.2018.01.010

Laboratory findings in Zika infection : The experience of a reference centre in North-West Italy. / Burdino, Elisa; Milia, Maria Grazia; Allice, Tiziano; Gregori, Gabriella; Ruggiero, Tina; Calleri, Guido; Lipani, Filippo; Lucchini, Anna; Venturi, Giulietta; Di Perri, Giovanni; Ghisetti, Valeria.

In: Journal of Clinical Virology, Vol. 101, 01.04.2018, p. 18-22.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Burdino, E, Milia, MG, Allice, T, Gregori, G, Ruggiero, T, Calleri, G, Lipani, F, Lucchini, A, Venturi, G, Di Perri, G & Ghisetti, V 2018, 'Laboratory findings in Zika infection: The experience of a reference centre in North-West Italy', Journal of Clinical Virology, vol. 101, pp. 18-22. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcv.2018.01.010
Burdino, Elisa ; Milia, Maria Grazia ; Allice, Tiziano ; Gregori, Gabriella ; Ruggiero, Tina ; Calleri, Guido ; Lipani, Filippo ; Lucchini, Anna ; Venturi, Giulietta ; Di Perri, Giovanni ; Ghisetti, Valeria. / Laboratory findings in Zika infection : The experience of a reference centre in North-West Italy. In: Journal of Clinical Virology. 2018 ; Vol. 101. pp. 18-22.
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abstract = "Background: Zika virus (ZIKV) remains a public health concern due to its association with fetal malformation and neurologic disease. Objective: To report a reference centre experience on ZIKA virus (ZIKV) infection in travelers from epidemic countries from January 1 to September, 30, 2016 in Italy North-West (a geographic area covering 4.424 million inhabitants, corresponding to almost 73{\%} of Italy North-West area). Study design: One hundred and twelve febrile travelers were studied to rule out a tropical fever [e.g. malaria, dengue (DENV), chikungunya (CHIKV), West Nile (WNV) and ZIKV]. Molecular tests for detecting ZIKV RNA were applied on serum or urine as well as IgG and IgM specific serology. Results: ZIKV was the most frequent “tropical infection (11.6{\%}) with 12 infected travelers and one sexual partner of an infected traveler. At the time of the diagnosis, ZIKV RNA was detected in the blood from 9 patients (69{\%}) within 7 days from symptom onset; afterwards, the virus was detected only in urine (5 patients) and ZIKV IgM was reactive in 9 patients (69{\%}). Travelers with ZIKV infection tested negative for DENV, CHIKV, WNV and malaria and completely recovered. Other infections identified in travelers were DENV (5 patients, 4.5{\%}), CHIKV (1, 0.9{\%}), malaria (Plasmodium vivax, 1, 0.9{\%}), measles (1, 0.9{\%}) and tuberculosis (1, 0.9{\%}). Conclusions: The etiologic diagnosis of a febrile illness in travelers where ZIKV is endemic is highly desirable as they are sentinel of a challenging epidemiology including the risk of autochthonous transmission in non endemic countries where the competent or carrier vector is present.",
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