Laboratory test variability and model for end-stage liver disease score calculation

Effect on liver allocation and proposal for adjustment

Matteo Ravaioli, Michele Masetti, Lorenza Ridolfi, Maurizio Capelli, Gian Luca Grazi, Nicola Venturoli, Fabrizio Di Benedetto, Francesco Bianco Bianchi, Giulia Cavrini, Stefano Faenza, Bruno Begliomini, Antonio Daniele Pinna, Giorgio Enrico Gerunda, Giorgio Ballardini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND. The use of the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score to prioritize patients on liver waiting lists must take the bias of different laboratories into account. METHODS. We evaluated the outcome of 418 patients listed during 1 year whose MELD score was computed by two laboratories (lab 1 and lab 2). The two labs had different normality ranges for bilirubin (maximal normal value [Vmax]: 1.1 for lab 1 and 1.2 for lab 2) and creatinine (Vmax: 1.2 for lab 1 and 1.4 for lab 2). The outcome during the waiting time was evaluated by considering the liver transplantations and the dropouts, which included deaths on the list, tumor progression, and patients who were too sick. RESULTS. Although the clinical features of patients were similar between the two laboratories, 36 (13.1%) out of 275 were dropped from the list in lab 1, compared to 5 (3.5%) out of 143 in lab 2 (P

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)919-924
Number of pages6
JournalTransplantation
Volume83
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2007

Fingerprint

End Stage Liver Disease
Liver
Waiting Lists
Bilirubin
Liver Transplantation
Creatinine
Reference Values
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Allocation
  • Dropout
  • Liver transplantation
  • MELD
  • Waiting list

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation
  • Immunology

Cite this

Laboratory test variability and model for end-stage liver disease score calculation : Effect on liver allocation and proposal for adjustment. / Ravaioli, Matteo; Masetti, Michele; Ridolfi, Lorenza; Capelli, Maurizio; Grazi, Gian Luca; Venturoli, Nicola; Di Benedetto, Fabrizio; Bianchi, Francesco Bianco; Cavrini, Giulia; Faenza, Stefano; Begliomini, Bruno; Pinna, Antonio Daniele; Gerunda, Giorgio Enrico; Ballardini, Giorgio.

In: Transplantation, Vol. 83, No. 7, 04.2007, p. 919-924.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ravaioli, M, Masetti, M, Ridolfi, L, Capelli, M, Grazi, GL, Venturoli, N, Di Benedetto, F, Bianchi, FB, Cavrini, G, Faenza, S, Begliomini, B, Pinna, AD, Gerunda, GE & Ballardini, G 2007, 'Laboratory test variability and model for end-stage liver disease score calculation: Effect on liver allocation and proposal for adjustment', Transplantation, vol. 83, no. 7, pp. 919-924. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.tp.0000259251.92398.2a
Ravaioli, Matteo ; Masetti, Michele ; Ridolfi, Lorenza ; Capelli, Maurizio ; Grazi, Gian Luca ; Venturoli, Nicola ; Di Benedetto, Fabrizio ; Bianchi, Francesco Bianco ; Cavrini, Giulia ; Faenza, Stefano ; Begliomini, Bruno ; Pinna, Antonio Daniele ; Gerunda, Giorgio Enrico ; Ballardini, Giorgio. / Laboratory test variability and model for end-stage liver disease score calculation : Effect on liver allocation and proposal for adjustment. In: Transplantation. 2007 ; Vol. 83, No. 7. pp. 919-924.
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