Lack of effect of percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty on nocturnal hypotension in renovascular hypertensive patients

Antonella Ravogli, Fabrizio Arzilli, Stefano Omboni, Roberto Giovannetti, Emanuela Mutti, Antonio Salvetti, Giuseppe Mancia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. To investigate whether nocturnal blood pressure fall is blunted in renovascular hypertension and can therefore be used as a as a diagnostic criterion for this condition. Methods. In 14 renovascular hypertensive patients (age 43.8 ± 2.1 years, mean ± SEM, clinic blood pressure 173.6 ± 3.7 mmHg systolic and 109.0 ± 2.0 mmHg diastolic) and in 14 age- and blood pressure-matched essential hypertensive controls 24 h ambulatory blood pressure was measured after washout from drug treatment, during angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor treatment and, in renovascular hypertension, also after percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty. Results. The 24 h average systolic and diastolic blood pressures were 146.4 ± 5.7 and 97.5 ± 3.6 mmHg in renovascular and 144.3 ± 1.2 and 98.0 ± 2.2 mmHg in essential hypertensive patients. The angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor treatment reduced 24 h average systolic and diastolic blood pressures by 8.5% and 9.7% in the renovascular and by 8.3% and 10.8% in the essential hypertensive group. Greater systolic and diastolic blood pressure reductions (-18.2% and -18.1%) were observed in renovascular hypertensive patients after percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty. Blood pressure fell by about 10% during the night and the fall was similar in renovascular and in essential hypertensive patients. In the former group, nocturnal hypotension was similar after washout, during angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor treatment and after percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty. Similar results were obtained for nocturnal bradycardia. Conclusions. Nocturnal blood pressure fall is equally manifest in renovascular and essential hypertension. The removal of the renal artery stenosis and blood pressure normalization do not enhance this phenomenon. Nocturnal hypotension seems therefore to be unaffected by renovascular hypertension.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)53-56
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Hypertension
Volume14
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1996

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Angioplasty
Hypotension
Blood Pressure
Kidney
Renovascular Hypertension
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors
Renal Artery Obstruction
Therapeutics
Bradycardia

Keywords

  • 24 h blood pressure
  • Circadian rhythm
  • Renovascular hypertension

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Ravogli, A., Arzilli, F., Omboni, S., Giovannetti, R., Mutti, E., Salvetti, A., & Mancia, G. (1996). Lack of effect of percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty on nocturnal hypotension in renovascular hypertensive patients. Journal of Hypertension, 14(1), 53-56.

Lack of effect of percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty on nocturnal hypotension in renovascular hypertensive patients. / Ravogli, Antonella; Arzilli, Fabrizio; Omboni, Stefano; Giovannetti, Roberto; Mutti, Emanuela; Salvetti, Antonio; Mancia, Giuseppe.

In: Journal of Hypertension, Vol. 14, No. 1, 1996, p. 53-56.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ravogli, A, Arzilli, F, Omboni, S, Giovannetti, R, Mutti, E, Salvetti, A & Mancia, G 1996, 'Lack of effect of percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty on nocturnal hypotension in renovascular hypertensive patients', Journal of Hypertension, vol. 14, no. 1, pp. 53-56.
Ravogli, Antonella ; Arzilli, Fabrizio ; Omboni, Stefano ; Giovannetti, Roberto ; Mutti, Emanuela ; Salvetti, Antonio ; Mancia, Giuseppe. / Lack of effect of percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty on nocturnal hypotension in renovascular hypertensive patients. In: Journal of Hypertension. 1996 ; Vol. 14, No. 1. pp. 53-56.
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AU - Giovannetti, Roberto

AU - Mutti, Emanuela

AU - Salvetti, Antonio

AU - Mancia, Giuseppe

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AB - Objective. To investigate whether nocturnal blood pressure fall is blunted in renovascular hypertension and can therefore be used as a as a diagnostic criterion for this condition. Methods. In 14 renovascular hypertensive patients (age 43.8 ± 2.1 years, mean ± SEM, clinic blood pressure 173.6 ± 3.7 mmHg systolic and 109.0 ± 2.0 mmHg diastolic) and in 14 age- and blood pressure-matched essential hypertensive controls 24 h ambulatory blood pressure was measured after washout from drug treatment, during angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor treatment and, in renovascular hypertension, also after percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty. Results. The 24 h average systolic and diastolic blood pressures were 146.4 ± 5.7 and 97.5 ± 3.6 mmHg in renovascular and 144.3 ± 1.2 and 98.0 ± 2.2 mmHg in essential hypertensive patients. The angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor treatment reduced 24 h average systolic and diastolic blood pressures by 8.5% and 9.7% in the renovascular and by 8.3% and 10.8% in the essential hypertensive group. Greater systolic and diastolic blood pressure reductions (-18.2% and -18.1%) were observed in renovascular hypertensive patients after percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty. Blood pressure fell by about 10% during the night and the fall was similar in renovascular and in essential hypertensive patients. In the former group, nocturnal hypotension was similar after washout, during angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor treatment and after percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty. Similar results were obtained for nocturnal bradycardia. Conclusions. Nocturnal blood pressure fall is equally manifest in renovascular and essential hypertension. The removal of the renal artery stenosis and blood pressure normalization do not enhance this phenomenon. Nocturnal hypotension seems therefore to be unaffected by renovascular hypertension.

KW - 24 h blood pressure

KW - Circadian rhythm

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