Laparoscopic vs. open colectomy in cancer patients: Long-term complications, quality of life, and survival

Marco Braga, Matteo Frasson, Andrea Vignali, Walter Zuliani, Vittorio Civelli, Valerio Di Carlo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

PURPOSE: This study was designed to evaluate long-term complications, quality of life, and survival rate in a series of colorectal cancer patients randomized to laparoscopic or open surgery. METHODS: A total of 391 patients with colorectal cancer were randomly assigned to laparoscopic (n = 190) or open (n = 201) resection. Long-term follow-up was performed every six months by office visits. Quality of life was assessed at 12, 24, and 48 months after surgery by a modified version of Short Form 36 Health Survey questionnaire. All patients were analyzed on an intention-to-treat basis. RESULTS: Eight (4.2 percent) laparoscopic group patients needed conversion to open surgery. Overall long-term morbidity rate was 6.8 percent (13/190) in the laparoscopic vs. 14.9 percent (30/201) in the open group (P = 0.018). Overall quality of life was significantly better in the laparoscopic group in the first 12 months after surgery, whereas at 24 months, patients of the laparoscopic group reported a significant advantage only in social functioning. No difference was found in both overall and disease-free survival rates by comparing laparoscopic vs. open group. CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopic colorectal resection was associated with a lower incidence of long-term complications and a better quality of life in the first 12 months after surgery compared with open surgery. No difference between groups was found in overall and disease-free survival rates.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2217-2223
Number of pages7
JournalDiseases of the Colon and Rectum
Volume48
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2005

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Colectomy
Quality of Life
Survival
Survival Rate
Neoplasms
Disease-Free Survival
Colorectal Neoplasms
Conversion to Open Surgery
Office Visits
Health Surveys
Morbidity
Incidence

Keywords

  • Colorectal cancer
  • Laparoscopy
  • Postoperative complications
  • Quality of life
  • Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Laparoscopic vs. open colectomy in cancer patients : Long-term complications, quality of life, and survival. / Braga, Marco; Frasson, Matteo; Vignali, Andrea; Zuliani, Walter; Civelli, Vittorio; Di Carlo, Valerio.

In: Diseases of the Colon and Rectum, Vol. 48, No. 12, 12.2005, p. 2217-2223.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Braga, Marco ; Frasson, Matteo ; Vignali, Andrea ; Zuliani, Walter ; Civelli, Vittorio ; Di Carlo, Valerio. / Laparoscopic vs. open colectomy in cancer patients : Long-term complications, quality of life, and survival. In: Diseases of the Colon and Rectum. 2005 ; Vol. 48, No. 12. pp. 2217-2223.
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