Laryngeal mask airway for neonatal resuscitation in a developing country

Evaluation of an educational intervention. Neonatal LMA: An educational intervention in DRC

Vincenzo Zanardo, Alphonse Simbi, Massimo Micaglio, Francesco Cavallin, Leon Tshilolo, Daniele Trevisanuto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Studies carried out in developing countries have indicated that training courses in newborn resuscitation are efficacious in teaching local birth attendants how to properly utilize simple resuscitation devices. The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge and expertise gained by physicians and midwifes who participated in a Neonatal Resuscitation Course and workshop organized in a Third World Country on the use of Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA). Methods: A 28-item questionnaire, derived from the standard test contained in the American Heart Association and the American Academy of Pediatrics Neonatal Resuscitation Manual, was administered to 21 physicians and 7 midwifes before and after a course, which included a practical, hands-on workshop focusing on LMA positioning and bag-ventilation in a neonatal manikin. Results: The knowledge gained by the physicians was superior to that demonstrated by the midwifes. The physicians, in fact, demonstrated a significant improvement with respect to their pre-course knowledge. Both the physicians and the midwives showed a good level of expertise in manipulating the manipulating the manikin during the practical trial session. The midwifes and physicians almost unanimously manifested a high degree of approval of neonatal resuscitation by LMA, as they defined it a sustainable and cost-effective method requiring minimal expertise. Conclusions: Further studies are warranted to test the advantages and limits of the neonatal LMA training courses in developing countries.

Original languageEnglish
Article number254
JournalBMC Health Services Research
Volume10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

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Laryngeal Masks
Resuscitation
Developing Countries
Midwifery
Physicians
Manikins
Education
Ventilation
Teaching
Parturition
Newborn Infant
Pediatrics
Costs and Cost Analysis
Equipment and Supplies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

Cite this

Laryngeal mask airway for neonatal resuscitation in a developing country : Evaluation of an educational intervention. Neonatal LMA: An educational intervention in DRC. / Zanardo, Vincenzo; Simbi, Alphonse; Micaglio, Massimo; Cavallin, Francesco; Tshilolo, Leon; Trevisanuto, Daniele.

In: BMC Health Services Research, Vol. 10, 254, 2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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