Late-life depression versus amnestic mild cognitive impairment: Alzheimer's disease incidence in 4 years of follow-up

Michele Lauriola, Antonio Mangiacotti, Grazia D'Onofrio, Leandro Cascavilla, Francesco Paris, Filomena Ciccone, Monica Greco, Giulia Paroni, Davide Seripa, Antonio Greco

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background/Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate the prognostic power of late-life depression (LLD) compared with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) for the onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD) within 4 years of follow-up. Methods: We estimated the incidence of AD in 60 patients presenting with aMCI, 115 patients suffering of LLD treated with antidepressants with good compliance, and 66 healthy control (HC) patients, followed for 4 years. Results: The risk to develop AD, within 4 years, was 68.33% for aMCI and 49.57% for LLD. In AD patients 5.60% deteriorated without depression, and 72.20% deteriorated with depression after 4 years of follow-up (p < 0.0001). No HC patients deteriorated to AD or any other dementia type. Conclusion: In our results, aMCI was the first predictive condition that increased the risk to develop AD. Depression is a potentially preventable medical condition across the lifespan and may be a modifiable risk factor.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)140-153
Number of pages14
JournalDementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders
Volume46
Issue number3-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2018

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Amnestic mild cognitive impairment
  • Incidence
  • Late-life depression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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