Late-onset Crohn's disease: a comparison of disease behaviour and therapy with younger adult patients: the Italian Group for the Study of Inflammatory Bowel Disease 'AGED' study

Italian Group for the Study of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IG-IBD)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Disease phenotype and outcome of late-onset Crohn's disease are still poorly defined. METHODS: In this Italian nationwide multicentre retrospective study, patients diagnosed ≥65 years (late-onset) were compared with young adult-onset with 16-39 years and adult-onset Crohn's disease 40-64 years. Data were collected for 3 years following diagnosis. RESULTS: A total of 631 patients (late-onset 153, adult-onset 161, young adult-onset 317) were included. Colonic disease was more frequent in late-onset (P < 0005), stenosing behaviour was more frequent than in adult-onset (P < 0003), but fistulising disease was uncommon. Surgery rates were not different between the three age groups. Systemic steroids were prescribed more frequently in young adult-onset in the first year, but low bioavailability steroids were used more frequently in late-onset in the first 2 years after diagnosis (P < 0.036, P < 0.041, respectively). The use of immunomodulators and anti-TNF's even in patients with more complicated disease, that is, B2 or B3 behaviour (Montreal classification), remained significantly inferior (P < 0.0001) in late-onset compared to young adult-onset. Age at diagnosis, Charlson comorbidity index, and steroid used in the first year were negatively associated with the use of immunomodulators and biologics. Comorbidities, related medications and hospitalizations were more frequent in late-onset. Polypharmacy was present in 56% of elderly Crohn's disease patients. CONCLUSION: Thirty-two percent of late-onset Crohn's disease presented with complicated disease behaviour. Despite a comparable use of steroids and surgery, immunomodulators and biologics were used in a small number of patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1361-1369
Number of pages9
JournalEuropean journal of gastroenterology & hepatology
Volume31
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2019

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology
  • Gastroenterology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Late-onset Crohn's disease: a comparison of disease behaviour and therapy with younger adult patients: the Italian Group for the Study of Inflammatory Bowel Disease 'AGED' study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this