Late-onset neonatal group B streptococcal disease associated with breast milk transmission: Molecular typing using RAPD-PCR

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9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is considered to be the major cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis of bacterial origin. Late-onset GBS infection is infrequent and occurs between 1 week and 3 months of age. The transmission of GBS through the ingestion of breast milk is reported in the literature, but only a few of these cases have been confirmed by molecular techniques. In this article we report five cases of late-onset GBS disease: transmission through maternal milk was confirmed in four cases, using the random amplified polymorphic DNA polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR) typing assay. In addition, the RAPD-PCR assay showed that each of the isolated clones belonged to a different RAPD genotype, thus revealing that the late-onset GBS infections were not epidemiologically related.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEarly Human Development
Volume90
Issue numberSUPPL.1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Molecular Typing
Streptococcus agalactiae
Human Milk
DNA-Directed DNA Polymerase
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Bacterial Meningitides
Infection
Milk
Clone Cells
Eating
Genotype
Mothers

Keywords

  • Breast milk transmission
  • Group B streptococcal disease
  • Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "Late-onset neonatal group B streptococcal disease associated with breast milk transmission: Molecular typing using RAPD-PCR",
abstract = "Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is considered to be the major cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis of bacterial origin. Late-onset GBS infection is infrequent and occurs between 1 week and 3 months of age. The transmission of GBS through the ingestion of breast milk is reported in the literature, but only a few of these cases have been confirmed by molecular techniques. In this article we report five cases of late-onset GBS disease: transmission through maternal milk was confirmed in four cases, using the random amplified polymorphic DNA polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR) typing assay. In addition, the RAPD-PCR assay showed that each of the isolated clones belonged to a different RAPD genotype, thus revealing that the late-onset GBS infections were not epidemiologically related.",
keywords = "Breast milk transmission, Group B streptococcal disease, Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)",
author = "Micaela Brandolini and Marta Corbella and Patrizia Cambieri and Daniela Barbarini and Davide Sassera and Mauro Stronati and Piero Marone",
year = "2014",
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T1 - Late-onset neonatal group B streptococcal disease associated with breast milk transmission

T2 - Molecular typing using RAPD-PCR

AU - Brandolini, Micaela

AU - Corbella, Marta

AU - Cambieri, Patrizia

AU - Barbarini, Daniela

AU - Sassera, Davide

AU - Stronati, Mauro

AU - Marone, Piero

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is considered to be the major cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis of bacterial origin. Late-onset GBS infection is infrequent and occurs between 1 week and 3 months of age. The transmission of GBS through the ingestion of breast milk is reported in the literature, but only a few of these cases have been confirmed by molecular techniques. In this article we report five cases of late-onset GBS disease: transmission through maternal milk was confirmed in four cases, using the random amplified polymorphic DNA polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR) typing assay. In addition, the RAPD-PCR assay showed that each of the isolated clones belonged to a different RAPD genotype, thus revealing that the late-onset GBS infections were not epidemiologically related.

AB - Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is considered to be the major cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis of bacterial origin. Late-onset GBS infection is infrequent and occurs between 1 week and 3 months of age. The transmission of GBS through the ingestion of breast milk is reported in the literature, but only a few of these cases have been confirmed by molecular techniques. In this article we report five cases of late-onset GBS disease: transmission through maternal milk was confirmed in four cases, using the random amplified polymorphic DNA polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR) typing assay. In addition, the RAPD-PCR assay showed that each of the isolated clones belonged to a different RAPD genotype, thus revealing that the late-onset GBS infections were not epidemiologically related.

KW - Breast milk transmission

KW - Group B streptococcal disease

KW - Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)

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