Latency of prosaccades and antisaccades in professional shooters

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: This study evaluated hypothesis that the faster saccadic reaction time in professional clay-target shooters found in a previous study was because of a superiority of athletes arising at the attention level or at level of saccadic motor preparation. Method: Ten shooters with at least 6 yr of shooting training in Olympic shotgun disciplines and 10 control subjects participated in the experiments. In the first experiment, prosaccades were studied by comparing the saccadic latencies obtained from the overlap and gap paradigms. In the overlap paradigm, a target was presented randomly at one of four cardinal positions with the fixation point presented throughout the trial duration. In the gap paradigm, the fixation point was removed at the time of target presentation. In the second experiment, subjects were instructed to saccade as quickly as possible in the direction opposite to that of the target location (antisaccades). Results: Shooters had shorter saccadic latency than controls, both with gap and overlap conditions in the first experiment and in the antisaccade condition of the second experiment. Conclusion: This result indicates that athletes' advantage in saccadic reaction times cannot be attributed to improvement of the attentional mechanism of disengagement. Present results support the hypothesis that shooters develop shorter motor preparation to saccades.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)388-394
Number of pages7
JournalMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2006

Fingerprint

Saccades
Athletes
Reaction Time
Firearms
Direction compound
clay

Keywords

  • Athletes
  • Eye movement
  • Gap
  • Motor experience
  • Overlap
  • TRS

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Latency of prosaccades and antisaccades in professional shooters. / Morrillo, Micaela; Di Russo, Francesco; Pitzalis, Sabrina; Spinelli, Donatella.

In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Vol. 38, No. 2, 02.2006, p. 388-394.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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