Laterality in persons with intellectual disability. I - Do patients with trisomy 21 and Williams-Beuren syndrome differ from typically developing persons?

Michèle Carlier, Silvia Stefanini, Christine Deruelle, Virginia Volterra, Anne Lise Doyen, Christine Lamard, Véronique De Portzamparc, Stefano Vicari, Gene Fisch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Persons with trisomy 21 (T21) and Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) have different brain abnormalities which may affect manual laterality. We assessed 45 persons with T21 and 34 with WBS (mean age 13) and 81 typically developing children (TD). Manual laterality was assessed with a fifteen-item task administered two times, and Bishop's card-reaching task. We found more left-handers in the T21 group compared to the other two groups. Inconsistent laterality was higher in the two groups with genetic diseases than in the TD group. For Bishop's test, both T21 and WBS participants were less right-oriented than the TD group. They displayed different response patterns in midline crossing when reaching for the cards, but did not display more midline crossing inhibition than the TD group. Is atypical handedness linked to specific genetic syndromes and, more specifically for persons with T21, to the trisomy of some of the genes?

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)365-376
Number of pages12
JournalBehavior Genetics
Volume36
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2006

Keywords

  • Genetic diseases
  • Handedness
  • Mental retardation
  • Trisomy 21
  • Williams-Beuren syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Psychology(all)

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