Lead-haematoxylin as a stain for endocrine cells - Significance of staining and comparison with other selective methods

E. Solcia, C. Capella, G. Vassallo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A modification of MacConaill's lead-haematoxylin has been found to stain several endocrine cells producing polypeptides and monoamines, particularly A and D cells of the pancreatic islet, thyroid C cells, gastro-intestinal enterochromaffin cells, gastric G and X cells, pituitary ACTH and MSH cells, adrenal medullary cells, and chemoreceptive cells of the carotid body. A careful comparison of the results of this method with those of HCI-basic dye method and of monoamine methods suggested that carboxyl groups of proteins may be the main binding site of lead-haematoxylin. Experiments with various pretreatments of tissue sections support such a hypothesis. The possibility that biogenic amines take also some part in the staining cannot be ruled out.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)116-126
Number of pages11
JournalHistochemie
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1969

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Medicine(all)
  • Instrumentation

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