Left prefrontal cortex control of novel occurrences during recollection: A psychopharmacological study using scopolamine and event-related fMRI

M. Bozzali, S. E. MacPherson, R. J. Dolan, T. Shallice

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Recollection and familiarity represent two processes involved in episodic memory retrieval. We investigated how scopolamine (an antagonist of acetylcholine muscarinic receptors) influenced brain activity during memory retrieval, using a paradigm that separated recollection and familiarity. Eighteen healthy volunteers were recruited in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind design using event-related fMRI. Participants were required to perform a verbal recognition memory task within the scanner, either under placebo or scopolamine conditions. Depending on the subcondition, participants were required to make a simple recognition decision (old/new items) or base their decision on more specific information related to prior experience (target/non-target/new items). We show a drug modulation in left prefrontal and perirhinal cortex during recollection. Such an effect was specifically driven by novelty and showed an inverse correlation with accuracy performance. Additionally, we show a direct correlation between drug-related signal change in left prefrontal and perirhinal cortices. We discuss the findings in terms of acetylcholine mediation of the familiarity/novelty signal through perirhinal cortex and the control of the relative signal strength through prefrontal cortex.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)286-295
Number of pages10
JournalNeuroImage
Volume33
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 15 2006

Keywords

  • Episodic memory
  • Familiarity
  • fMRI
  • Recollection
  • Scopolamine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Neurology

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