Left ventricular diastolic function and cardiac performance during exercise in patients with acromegaly

Letizia Spinelli, Mario Petretta, Giuseppe Verderame, Giuseppe Carbone, Angela Assunta Venetucci, Andrea Petretta, Wanda Acampa, Domenico Bonaduce, Annamaria Colao, Alberto Cuocolo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Exercise-induced impairment of left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction is common in patients with acromegaly and normal resting systolic function. This study aimed to clarify whether diastolic dysfunction plays a role in the abnormal adaptation to exercise in these patients. Forty-eight patients with active acromegaly underwent LV radionuclide angiography at rest and during exercise. Doppler echocardiography was also performed to assess LV mass index and diastolic function by combined analysis of mitral and pulmonary flow velocity curves. LV ejection fraction at peak exercise was related to rest ejection fraction (r = 0.78; P <0.001), peak filling rate (r = 0.55; P <0.01), LV mass index (r = -0.56; P <0.001), and the difference between duration of diastolic reverse pulmonary vein flow and mitral flow at atrial contraction (A duration) (r = -0.54; P <0.01). At stepwise regression analysis, rest ejection fraction and A duration were the only variables that independently influenced (P <0.001) ejection fraction at peak exercise. Diastolic dysfunction is important in determining cardiac performance during exercise in patients with acromegaly and normal resting systolic function. Combined analysis of pulmonary vein and mitral flow velocity curves allows the identification of impaired LV diastolic function in such patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4105-4109
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume88
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

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