Left ventricular mass increase is associated with cognitive decline and dementia in the elderly independently of blood pressure

Angelo Scuteri, Roberta Coluccia, Lorenzo Castello, Edoardo Nevola, Anna Maria Brancati, Massimo Volpe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

AimsLeft ventricular (LV) mass increase is considered part of composite target organ damage in hypertension and an independent risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) events. This study was designed to explore whether left ventricular mass index (LVMI) is associated with cognitive decline and dementia in elderly subjects, independently of blood pressure (BP) levels.Methods and resultsFour hundred subjects (mean age 79 ± 6 years) were studied. Left ventricular mass was measured echocardiographically in accordance with American Society of Echocardiography and normalized for body height to the 2.7 (LVMI). Global cognitive function was evaluated with the mini-mental state examination (MMSE) (maximum score 30). Dementia was defined as an MMSE score ®. Prevalence of hypertension was 70 and diabetes mellitus was diagnosed in 25. No significant differences in traditional CV risk factors were observed across LVMI quartiles. Mini-mental state examination showed an inverse trend across LVMI quartiles (the higher the LVMI, the lower the MMSE, P for trend

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1525-1529
Number of pages5
JournalEuropean Heart Journal
Volume30
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2009

Keywords

  • Arterial stiffness
  • Blood pressure
  • Cognition
  • Dementia
  • Elderly
  • Left ventricular mass
  • Pulse wave velocity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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