Left Ventricular Mass Indexing in Infants, Children, and Adolescents: A Simplified Approach for the Identification of Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in Clinical Practice

Marcello Chinali, Francesco Emma, Claudia Esposito, Gabriele Rinelli, Alessio Franceschini, Anke Doyon, Francesca Raimondi, Giacomo Pongiglione, Franz Schaefer, Maria Chiara Matteucci

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To determine a simplified method to identify presence of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in pediatric populations because the relationship between heart growth and body growth in children has made indexing difficult for younger ages. Study design Healthy children (n = 400; 52% boys, 0-18 years of age) from 2 different European hospitals were studied to derive a simplified formula. Left ventricular mass (LVM) was calculated according to the Devereux formula. The derived approach to index LVM was tested on a validation cohort of 130 healthy children from a different hospital center. Results There was a strong nonlinear correlation between height and LVM. LVM was best related to height to a power of 2.16 with a correction factor of 0.09. Analysis of residuals for LVM/[(height2.16) + 0.09] showed an homoscedastic distribution in both sexes throughout the entire height range. A partition value of 45 g/m2.16 was defined as the upper normal limit for LVM index. As opposed to formula suggested by current guidelines (ie, LVM/height2.7) when applying the proposed approach in the validation cohort of 130 healthy participants, no false positives for LVH were found (0% vs 8%; P 2.16) value across the whole pediatric age range to identify LVH, without the time-consuming need of computing specific percentiles for height and sex.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)193-198
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume170
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 2016

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Left Ventricular Hypertrophy
Pediatrics
Growth
Healthy Volunteers
Guidelines
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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Left Ventricular Mass Indexing in Infants, Children, and Adolescents : A Simplified Approach for the Identification of Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in Clinical Practice. / Chinali, Marcello; Emma, Francesco; Esposito, Claudia; Rinelli, Gabriele; Franceschini, Alessio; Doyon, Anke; Raimondi, Francesca; Pongiglione, Giacomo; Schaefer, Franz; Matteucci, Maria Chiara.

In: Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 170, 01.03.2016, p. 193-198.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chinali, Marcello ; Emma, Francesco ; Esposito, Claudia ; Rinelli, Gabriele ; Franceschini, Alessio ; Doyon, Anke ; Raimondi, Francesca ; Pongiglione, Giacomo ; Schaefer, Franz ; Matteucci, Maria Chiara. / Left Ventricular Mass Indexing in Infants, Children, and Adolescents : A Simplified Approach for the Identification of Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in Clinical Practice. In: Journal of Pediatrics. 2016 ; Vol. 170. pp. 193-198.
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abstract = "Objective To determine a simplified method to identify presence of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in pediatric populations because the relationship between heart growth and body growth in children has made indexing difficult for younger ages. Study design Healthy children (n = 400; 52{\%} boys, 0-18 years of age) from 2 different European hospitals were studied to derive a simplified formula. Left ventricular mass (LVM) was calculated according to the Devereux formula. The derived approach to index LVM was tested on a validation cohort of 130 healthy children from a different hospital center. Results There was a strong nonlinear correlation between height and LVM. LVM was best related to height to a power of 2.16 with a correction factor of 0.09. Analysis of residuals for LVM/[(height2.16) + 0.09] showed an homoscedastic distribution in both sexes throughout the entire height range. A partition value of 45 g/m2.16 was defined as the upper normal limit for LVM index. As opposed to formula suggested by current guidelines (ie, LVM/height2.7) when applying the proposed approach in the validation cohort of 130 healthy participants, no false positives for LVH were found (0{\%} vs 8{\%}; P 2.16) value across the whole pediatric age range to identify LVH, without the time-consuming need of computing specific percentiles for height and sex.",
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