Lenalidomide can induce long-term responses in patients with multiple myeloma relapsing after multiple chemotherapy lines, in particular after allogeneic transplant

Francesco Spina, Vittorio Montefusco, Claudia Crippa, Annalisa Citro, Simona Sammassimo, Barbara Olivero, Silvia Gentili, Monica Galli, Tommasina Guglielmelli, Davide Rossi, Antonietta Pia Falcone, Mariella Grasso, Francesca Patriarca, Marianna De Muro, Paolo Corradini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Evidence of long-term response to lenalidomide in heavily pretreated patients with multiple myeloma is lacking. This study sought to assess whether long-term responders exist, long-term responders' characteristics, and predictive factors of a long-term response. One hundred and four patients with multiple myeloma treated with lenalidomide and dexamethasone after ≥2 therapy lines (median, 3) were analyzed. Long-term response was defined as at least a partial response (≥PR) lasting ≥ 12 months. The overall response rate was 73%, and 80.3% of the res onses were achieved within 5 months. The median response was 14.3 months. Patients evaluable for long-term response numbered 87, and a total of 47% were long-term responders. Compared to non-long-term responders, long-term responders had better overall survival, less light-chain multiple myeloma, and higher incidence of t(11;14). Previous allogeneic transplant (alloSCT) and the response quality predicted a long-term response. In conclusion, patients treated with lenalidomide can become long-term responders; alloSCT and response quality predict long-term response.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1262-1270
Number of pages9
JournalLeukemia and Lymphoma
Volume52
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2011

Keywords

  • lenalidomide
  • long-term response
  • Myeloma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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