Lenalidomide monotherapy in heavily pretreated patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma: An Italian observational multicenter retrospective study in daily clinical practice

Pier Luigi Zinzani, Luigi Rigacci, Maria Cristina Cox, Liliana Devizzi, Alberto Fabbri, Alfonso Zaccaria, Francesco Zaja, Alice Di Rocco, Giuseppe Rossi, Sergio Storti, Pier Paolo Fattori, Lisa Argnani, Sante Tura, Umberto Vitolo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Clinical trial results indicate that lenalidomide, an immunomodulatory drug, is a promising treatment in relapsed/refractory non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). This retrospective multicenter study was conducted in patients with relapsed/refractory NHL treated with lenalidomide monotherapy through a Named Patient Program in Italy. Principal endpoints were overall response rate (ORR), safety and overall survival (OS). The ORR in 64 evaluable patients was 42.2% and was similar among patients receiving 10, 15 or 25 mg/day lenalidomide. Response rates in patients with mantle cell, diffuse large B-cell and follicular lymphoma were 45.5%, 42.1% and 20%, respectively. Among patients who responded to most recent prior therapy, ORR was 50.0% versus 36.8% in patients with refractory NHL. Mean duration of response in patients receiving any lenalidomide dose was 10.5 months; 1-year progression-free survival and OS were 50.3% and 82.6%, respectively. These findings suggest that lenalidomide is effective and safe for heavily pretreated patients with NHL in the clinical setting.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1671-1676
Number of pages6
JournalLeukemia and Lymphoma
Volume56
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2015

Keywords

  • Lenalidomide
  • Non-Hodgkin lymphoma
  • Off-label
  • Refractory
  • Relapsed

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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