Lentiviral vectors carrying enhancer elements of Hb9 promoter drive selective transgene expression in mouse spinal cord motor neurons

Marco Peviani, Mami Kurosaki, Mineko Terao, Dario Lidonnici, Francesco Gensano, Elisa Battaglia, Massimo Tortarolo, Roberto Piva, Caterina Bendotti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Recombinant lentiviral vectors (rLVs) have emerged as versatile tools for gene delivery applications due to a number of favorable features, such as the possibility to maintain long-term transgene expression, the flexibility in the design of the expression cassettes and recent improvements in their biosafety profile. Since rLVs are able to infect multiple cell types including post-mitotic cells such as neurons and skeletal muscle cells, several studies have been exploring their application for the study and cure of neurodegenerative diseases. In particular, the introduction of rLVs carrying cell-type specific promoters could restrict the transgene expression either to neuronal or glial cells, thus helping to better dissect in vivo the role played by these cell populations in several neurodegenerative processes. In this study we developed rLVs carrying motor neuron specific regulatory sequences derived from the promoter of homeobox gene Hb9, and demonstrated that these constructs can represent a suitable platform for selective gene-targeting of murine spinal cord motor neurons, in vivo. This tool could be instrumental in the dissection of the molecular mechanisms involved in the selective degeneration of motor neurons occurring in Motor Neuron Diseases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)139-147
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Neuroscience Methods
Volume205
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 30 2012

Keywords

  • Cell targeting
  • Motor neurons
  • Promoters
  • Viral vectors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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