Lentiviral vectors containing the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 central polypurine tract can efficiently transduce nondividing hepatocytes and antigen-presenting cells in vivo

Thierry VandenDriessche, Lieven Thorrez, Luigi Naldini, Antonia Follenzi, Lieve Moons, Zwi Berneman, Desire Collen, Marinee K L Chuah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

191 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

High-titer self-inactivating human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1)-based vectors expressing the green fluorescent protein reporter gene that contained the central polypurine and termination tract and the woodchuck hepatitis virus post-transcriptional regulatory element were constructed. Transduction efficiency and biodistribution were determined, following systemic administration of these improved lentiviral vectors. In adult severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice, efficient stable gene transfer was achieved in the liver (8.0% ± 6.0%) and spleen (24% ± 3%). Most transduced hepatocytes and nonhepatocytes were nondividing, thereby obviating the need to induce liver cell proliferation. In vivo gene transfer with this improved lentiviral vector was relatively safe since liver enzyme concentration in the plasma was only moderately and transiently elevated. In addition, nondividing major histocompatbility complex class II-positive splenic antigen-presenting cells (APCs) were efficiently transduced in SCID and normal mice. Furthermore, B cells were efficiently transduced, whereas T cells were refractory to lentiviral transduction in vivo. However, in neonatal recipients, lentiviral transduction was more widespread and included not only hepatocytes and splenic APCs but also cardiomyocytes. The present study suggests potential uses of improved lentiviral vectors for gene therapy of genetic blood disorders resulting from serum protein deficiencies, such as hemophilia, and hepatic disease. However, the use of liver-specific promoters may be warranted to circumvent inadvertent transgene expression in APCs. In addition, these improved lentiviral vectors could potentially be useful for genetic vaccination and treatment of perinatal cardiac disorders.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)813-822
Number of pages10
JournalBlood
Volume100
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1 2002

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Antigen-Presenting Cells
Viruses
HIV-1
Hepatocytes
Liver
Gene transfer
Severe Combined Immunodeficiency
Woodchuck Hepatitis B Virus
Transcriptional Regulatory Elements
Gene therapy
Protein Deficiency
Inborn Genetic Diseases
T-cells
Cell proliferation
Hemophilia A
Green Fluorescent Proteins
Transgenes
Reporter Genes
Cardiac Myocytes
Genetic Therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

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Lentiviral vectors containing the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 central polypurine tract can efficiently transduce nondividing hepatocytes and antigen-presenting cells in vivo. / VandenDriessche, Thierry; Thorrez, Lieven; Naldini, Luigi; Follenzi, Antonia; Moons, Lieve; Berneman, Zwi; Collen, Desire; Chuah, Marinee K L.

In: Blood, Vol. 100, No. 3, 01.08.2002, p. 813-822.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

VandenDriessche, Thierry ; Thorrez, Lieven ; Naldini, Luigi ; Follenzi, Antonia ; Moons, Lieve ; Berneman, Zwi ; Collen, Desire ; Chuah, Marinee K L. / Lentiviral vectors containing the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 central polypurine tract can efficiently transduce nondividing hepatocytes and antigen-presenting cells in vivo. In: Blood. 2002 ; Vol. 100, No. 3. pp. 813-822.
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