Leptin modulates the survival of autoreactive CD4+ T cells through the nutrient/energy-sensing mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway

Mario Galgani, Claudio Procaccini, Veronica De Rosa, Fortunata Carbone, Paolo Chieffi, Antonio La Cava, Giuseppe Matarese

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Chronic inflammation can associate with autoreactive immune responses, including CD4+ T cell responses to self-Ags. In this paper, we show that the adipocyte-derived proinflammatory hormone leptin can affect the survival and proliferation of autoreactive CD4+ T cells in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, an animal model of human multiple sclerosis. We found that myelin olygodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide 35-55 (MOG35-55)-specific CD4+ T cells from C57BL/6J wild-type mice could not transfer experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis into leptin-deficient ob/ob mice. Such a finding was associated with a reduced proliferation of the transferred MOG35-55-reactive CD4+ T cells, which had a reduced degradation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27kip1 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. The transferred cells displayed reduced Th1/Th17 responses and reduced delayedtype hypersensitivity. Moreover, MOG35-55-reactive CD4+ T cells in ob/ob mice underwent apoptosis that associated with a downmodulation of Bcl-2. Similar results were observed in transgenic AND-TCR-mice carrying a TCR specific for the pigeon cytochrome c 88-104 peptide. These molecular events reveal a reduced activity of the nutrient/energy-sensing AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, which can be restored in vivo by exogenous leptin replacement. These results may help to explain a link between chronic inflammation and autoimmune T cell reactivity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7474-7479
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume185
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 15 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

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