Linezolid-induced lactic acidosis: the thin line between bacterial and mitochondrial ribosomes

Alessandro Santini, Dario Ronchi, Manuela Garbellini, Daniela Piga, Alessandro Protti

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Introduction: Linezolid inhibits bacterial growth by targeting bacterial ribosomes and by interfering with bacterial protein synthesis. Lactic acidosis is a rare, but potentially lethal, side effect of linezolid. Areas covered: The pathogenesis of linezolid-induced lactic acidosis is reviewed with special emphasis on aspects relevant to the recognition, prevention and treatment of the syndrome. Expert opinion: Linezolid-induced lactic acidosis reflects the untoward interaction between the drug and mitochondrial ribosomes. The inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis diminishes the respiratory chain enzyme content and thus limits aerobic energy production. As a result, anaerobic glycolysis and lactate generation accelerate independently from tissue hypoxia. In the absence of any confirmatory test, linezolid-induced lactic acidosis should be suspected only after exclusion of other, more common, causes of lactic acidosis such as hypoxemia, anemia or low cardiac output. Normal-to-high whole-body oxygen delivery, high venous oxygen saturation and lack of response to interventions that effectively increase tissue oxygen provision all suggest a primary defect in oxygen use at the mitochondrial level. During prolonged therapy with linezolid, blood drug and lactate levels should be regularly monitored. The current standard-of-care treatment of linezolid-induced lactic acidosis consists of drug withdrawal to reverse mitochondrial intoxication and intercurrent life support.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)833-843
Number of pages11
JournalExpert Opinion on Drug Safety
Volume16
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 3 2017

Fingerprint

Linezolid
Lactic Acidosis
Oxygen
Lactic Acid
Low Cardiac Output
Bacterial Proteins
Mitochondrial Proteins
Expert Testimony
Glycolysis
Standard of Care
Electron Transport
Mitochondrial Ribosomes
Ribosomes
Drug Interactions
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Anemia

Keywords

  • lactic acidosis
  • Linezolid
  • mitochondria
  • oxazolidinones
  • oxygen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Linezolid-induced lactic acidosis : the thin line between bacterial and mitochondrial ribosomes. / Santini, Alessandro; Ronchi, Dario; Garbellini, Manuela; Piga, Daniela; Protti, Alessandro.

In: Expert Opinion on Drug Safety, Vol. 16, No. 7, 03.07.2017, p. 833-843.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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