Lipid-transfer protein is the major maize allergen maintaining IgE-binding activity after cooking at 100°C, as demonstrated in anaphylactic patients and patients with positive double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge results

Elide Anna Pastorello, Carlo Pompei, Valerio Pravettoni, Laura Farioli, Ambra Marianna Calamari, Joseph Scibilia, Anna Maria Robino, Amedeo Conti, Stefania Iametti, Donatella Fortunato, Simona Bonomi, Claudio Ortolani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: In a previous study a 9-kd lipid-transfer protein (LTP) was identified as the major allergen of raw maize in a population of 22 anaphylactic patients. However, the stability of this protein in cooked maize is unknown. Objective: We investigated the allergenicity of 5 maize hybrids and its modification after different thermal treatments by using sera from anaphylactic patients and patients with positive double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges. Methods: Five maize hybrids were extracted by using different methods, obtaining the water-soluble, zein, total zein, glutelin, and total protein fractions. The IgE-binding capacity of the different extracts, both raw and after thermal treatment, was investigated by means of SDS-PAGE immunoblotting. A 9-kd heat-stable allergen was purified by means of HPLC and sequenced. Changes in its secondary structure during and after heating from 25°C to 100°C were monitored by means of circular dichroism. Results: All raw maize hybrids showed similar protein and IgE-binding profiles. The SDS-PAGE of all the heat-treated hybrids demonstrated a decreased number of stained bands in respect to the raw samples. The IgE immunoblotting demonstrated that the major allergen of the water-soluble, total zein, total protein, and glutelin fractions was a 9-kd protein identified by means of amino acid sequence as an LTP and a subtilisin-chymotrypsin inhibitor (in total zein fraction). The IgE-binding capacity of this 9-kd protein remained unchanged after thermal treatments, even though circular dichroism demonstrated an altered secondary structure. Conclusions: Maize LTP maintains its IgE-binding capacity after heat treatment, thus being the most eligible candidate for a causative role in severe anaphylactic reactions to both raw and cooked maize.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)775-783
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume112
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1 2003

Keywords

  • Double-blind
  • Food anaphylaxis
  • Lipid-transfer protein
  • Maize allergy
  • Placebo-controlled food challenge
  • Thermal treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Lipid-transfer protein is the major maize allergen maintaining IgE-binding activity after cooking at 100°C, as demonstrated in anaphylactic patients and patients with positive double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge results'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this