Listening to white noise counteracts visual and haptic pseudoneglect

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Neurologically intact individuals usually show a leftward bias in line bisection, a tendency known as "pseudoneglect", likely reflecting a right-hemisphere dominance in controlling the allocation of spatial attention. Studies in brain-damaged patients with left visuospatial neglect have reported that auditory stimulation may reduce the deficit, both in a spatially dependent and in a spatially independent way. Here we show for the first time that the concurrent binaural presentation of auditory white noise affects healthy individuals' performance in both visual and haptic bisection, reducing their leftward error. We suggest that this effect depends on the noise boosting alertness and restoring the hemispheric activation balance. Our data clearly show that task-irrelevant auditory noise crossmodally affects the allocation of spatial resources in both the haptic and the visual space; future research may clarify whether these effects are specific for the type of auditory stimulation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1395-1398
Number of pages4
JournalPerception
Volume41
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Fingerprint

Acoustic Stimulation
White noise
Noise
Brain
Chemical activation
Resource Allocation

Keywords

  • Arousal
  • Auditory noise
  • Bisection
  • Crossmodal
  • Hemispheric
  • Pseudoneglect

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Sensory Systems

Cite this

Listening to white noise counteracts visual and haptic pseudoneglect. / Cattaneo, Zaira; Lega, Carlotta; Vecchi, Tomaso; Vallar, Giuseppe.

In: Perception, Vol. 41, No. 11, 2012, p. 1395-1398.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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