Loneliness, social networks, and health

A cross-sectional study in three countries

Laura Alejandra Rico-Uribe, Francisco Félix Caballero, Beatriz Olaya, Beata Tobiasz-Adamczyk, Seppo Koskinen, Matilde Leonardi, Josep Maria Haro, Somnath Chatterji, José Luis Ayuso-Mateos, Marta Miret

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: It is widely recognized that social networks and loneliness have effects on health. The present study assesses the differential association that the components of the social network and the subjective perception of loneliness have with health, and analyzes whether this association is different across different countries. Methods: A total of 10 800 adults were interviewed in Finland, Poland and Spain. Loneliness was assessed by means of the 3-item UCLA Loneliness Scale. Individuals' social networks were measured by asking about the number of members in the network, how often they had contacts with these members, and whether they had a close relationship. The differential association of loneliness and the components of the social network with health was assessed by means of hierarchical linear regression models, controlling for relevant covariates. Results: In all three countries, loneliness was the variable most strongly correlated with health after controlling for depression, age, and other covariates. Loneliness contributed more strongly to health than any component of the social network. The relationship between loneliness and health was stronger in Finland (|β| = 0.25) than in Poland (|β| = 0.16) and Spain (|β| = 0.18). Frequency of contact was the only component of the social network that was moderately correlated with health. Conclusions: Loneliness has a stronger association with health than the components of the social network. This association is similar in three different European countries with different socioeconomic and health characteristics and welfare systems. The importance of evaluating and screening feelings of loneliness in individuals with health problems should be taken into account. Further studies are needed in order to be able to confirm the associations found in the present study and infer causality.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0145264
JournalPLoS One
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2016

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Loneliness
social networks
cross-sectional studies
Social Support
Cross-Sectional Studies
Health
Finland
Poland
Spain
Linear Models
socioeconomics
Medical problems
Linear regression
screening
Causality
Screening
Emotions
Depression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Rico-Uribe, L. A., Caballero, F. F., Olaya, B., Tobiasz-Adamczyk, B., Koskinen, S., Leonardi, M., ... Miret, M. (2016). Loneliness, social networks, and health: A cross-sectional study in three countries. PLoS One, 11(1), [e0145264]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0145264

Loneliness, social networks, and health : A cross-sectional study in three countries. / Rico-Uribe, Laura Alejandra; Caballero, Francisco Félix; Olaya, Beatriz; Tobiasz-Adamczyk, Beata; Koskinen, Seppo; Leonardi, Matilde; Haro, Josep Maria; Chatterji, Somnath; Ayuso-Mateos, José Luis; Miret, Marta.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 11, No. 1, e0145264, 01.01.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rico-Uribe, LA, Caballero, FF, Olaya, B, Tobiasz-Adamczyk, B, Koskinen, S, Leonardi, M, Haro, JM, Chatterji, S, Ayuso-Mateos, JL & Miret, M 2016, 'Loneliness, social networks, and health: A cross-sectional study in three countries', PLoS One, vol. 11, no. 1, e0145264. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0145264
Rico-Uribe LA, Caballero FF, Olaya B, Tobiasz-Adamczyk B, Koskinen S, Leonardi M et al. Loneliness, social networks, and health: A cross-sectional study in three countries. PLoS One. 2016 Jan 1;11(1). e0145264. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0145264
Rico-Uribe, Laura Alejandra ; Caballero, Francisco Félix ; Olaya, Beatriz ; Tobiasz-Adamczyk, Beata ; Koskinen, Seppo ; Leonardi, Matilde ; Haro, Josep Maria ; Chatterji, Somnath ; Ayuso-Mateos, José Luis ; Miret, Marta. / Loneliness, social networks, and health : A cross-sectional study in three countries. In: PLoS One. 2016 ; Vol. 11, No. 1.
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