Long-term effects of monocular deprivation revealed with binocular rivalry gratings modulated in luminance and in color

Claudia Lunghi, David C. Burr, M. Concetta Morrone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

During development, within a specific temporal window called the critical period, the mammalian visual cortex is highly plastic and literally shaped by visual experience; to what extent this extraordinary plasticity is retained in the adult brain is still a debated issue. We tested the residual plastic potential of the adult visual cortex for both achromatic and chromatic vision by measuring binocular rivalry in adult humans following 150 minutes of monocular patching. Paradoxically, monocular deprivation resulted in lengthening of the mean phase duration of both luminance-modulated and equiluminant stimuli for the deprived eye and complementary shortening of nondeprived phase durations, suggesting an initial homeostatic compensation for the lack of information following monocular deprivation. When equiluminant gratings were tested, the effect was measurable for at least 180 minutes after reexposure to binocular vision, compared with 90 minutes for achromatic gratings. Our results suggest that chromatic vision shows a high degree of plasticity, retaining the effect for a duration (180 minutes) longer than that of the deprivation period (150 minutes) and twice as long as that found with achromatic gratings. The results are in line with evidence showing a higher vulnerability of the P pathway to the effects of visual deprivation during development and a slower development of chromatic vision in humans.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1
JournalJournal of Vision
Volume13
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Keywords

  • Contextual effects
  • Reverse correlation
  • Visual illusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems

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