Long term follow-up and outcome of liver transplantation for alcoholic liver disease: A single center case-control study

Maurizio Biselli, Annagiulia Gramenzi, Massimo Del Gaudio, Matteo Ravaioli, Giovanni Vitale, Stefano Gitto, Gian Luca Grazi, Antonio Daniele Pinna, Pietro Andreone, Mauro Bernardi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Alcoholic liver cirrhosis (ALC) is a leading indication for orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Goals: To investigate the long-term outcome of OLT for ALC compared with patients transplanted for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Study: From 1987 to 2001, 49 OLT were performed for ALC and 173 for HCV. From these contemporary groups we matched 1:2 ALC patients (cases) to 98 HCV (controls). The following variables were analyzed: survival, retransplantation, rejection, primary nonfunction, infections, de novo tumors, cardiovascular and neurologic complications, and alcoholic recurrence. Results: Actuarial survival rate at 9 years was comparable for cases and controls. Actuarial graft survival rate at 9 years was significantly higher in cases (78% vs. 60%; P=0.026). The retransplantation rate was higher in controls (21% vs. 4%; P=0.007). Post-OLT complications were not significantly different. The alcoholic recidivism rate was 28% without influence on patients or graft survival, whereas relapse of HCV caused the majority of death in controls (30%; P=0.042). At multivariate analysis retransplantation was the only predictor of patient survival (odds ratio: 4.35; 95% confidence interval: 2.16-8.74; P

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)52-57
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Gastroenterology
Volume44
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2010

Keywords

  • Alcoholic liver cirrhosis
  • Hepatitis C virus
  • Liver transplantation
  • Long-term outcome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

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