Long-term follow-up in atrophic body gastritis patients: Atrophy and intestinal metaplasia are persistent lesions irrespective of Helicobacter pylori infection

E. Lahner, C. Bordi, M. S. Cattaruzza, C. Iannoni, M. Milione, G. Delle Fave, B. Annibale

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Long-term outcome of atrophic body gastritis has not yet been defined. Aim: To investigate at long-term follow-up the behaviour of atrophy and intestinal metaplasia and the occurrence of neoplastic lesions in atrophic body gastritis patients. Methods: Overall 106 atrophic body gastritis patients with ≥ 4-year follow-up were studied; 38 were Helicobacter pylori-positive at histology + serology and cured of infection (group A), 36 were positive at serology and not treated (group B) and 32 were H. pylori-negative (group C). Patients underwent gastroscopy with antral (n = 3) and body (n = 3) biopsies for histology accord-ing to the Sydney System. Results: At 6.7-year follow-up body atrophy and intestinal metaplasia remained unchanged in all 106 patients irrespective of H. pylori status. Antral atrophy was significantly increased at follow-up only in group C, whereas antral intestinal metaplasia was unchanged in all three groups. During follow-up eight (8%) patients developed neoplastic lesions (one adenocarcinoma, one adenoma with low-grade dysplasia and six low-grade dysplasia without endoscopic lesions). Antral atrophic gastritis was present at baseline in all but one (88%) of the eight patients with neoplastic lesions, but only in 15 (15%) of the 98 patients without (P <0.0001, RR = 26.7). Conclusions: Atrophy and intestinal metaplasia persist at 6.7-year follow-up and atrophic body gastritis patients with panatrophic gastritis are at increased risk of developing neoplastic lesions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)471-481
Number of pages11
JournalAlimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Volume22
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2005

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Atrophic Gastritis
Metaplasia
Helicobacter Infections
Helicobacter pylori
Atrophy
Serology
Histology
Gastroscopy
Gastritis
Adenoma
Adenocarcinoma
Biopsy
Antral

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

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Long-term follow-up in atrophic body gastritis patients : Atrophy and intestinal metaplasia are persistent lesions irrespective of Helicobacter pylori infection. / Lahner, E.; Bordi, C.; Cattaruzza, M. S.; Iannoni, C.; Milione, M.; Delle Fave, G.; Annibale, B.

In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Vol. 22, No. 5, 01.09.2005, p. 471-481.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Milione, M.

AU - Delle Fave, G.

AU - Annibale, B.

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