Long-term glycemic control influences the long-lasting effect of hyperglycemia on endothelial function in type 1 diabetes

Antonio Ceriello, Katherine Esposito, Michael Ihnat, Jessica Thorpe, Dario Giugliano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of different periods of hyperglycemia on the reversal of endothelial dysfunction by glucose normalization and antioxidant therapy. Research Design and Methods: Ten healthy subjects and three subgroups of 10 type 1 diabetic subjects were enrolled as follows: 1) patients within 1 month of diagnosis; 2) patients between 4.5 and 5.2 yr from diagnosis and with glycosylated hemoglobin levels 7% or greater since diagnosis; 3) patients between 4.8 and 5.4 yr from diagnosis and with glycosylated hemoglobin levels greater than 7% since diagnosis. Each patient participated in three experiments: 1) 24-h insulin treatment, achieving a near normalization of glycemia, together with the addition of the antioxidant vitamin C during the last 12 h; 2) 24-h vitamin C treatment with insulin treatment for the last 12 h; and 3) treatment with both vitamin C and insulin for 24 h. Results: Endothelial function, as measured by flow-mediated vasodilation of the brachial artery and levels of nitrotyrosine, an oxidative stress marker, were normalized by each treatment in subgroups 1 and 2. In the third subgroup, neither glucose normalization nor vitamin C treatment alone was able to normalize endothelial dysfunction or oxidative stress. Combining insulin and vitamin C, however, normalized endothelial dysfunction and nitrotyrosine. Conclusions: This study suggests that long-lasting hyperglycemia in type 1 diabetic patients induces long-term alterations in endothelial cells, which may contribute to endothelial dysfunction and is interrupted only by both glucose and oxidative stress normalization.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2751-2756
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume94
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2009

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Medical problems
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Hyperglycemia
Ascorbic Acid
Oxidative stress
Insulin
Glycosylated Hemoglobin A
Glucose
Oxidative Stress
Antioxidants
Therapeutics
Endothelial cells
Brachial Artery
Vasodilation
Healthy Volunteers
Research Design
Endothelial Cells
Experiments
3-nitrotyrosine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology
  • Biochemistry, medical
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Long-term glycemic control influences the long-lasting effect of hyperglycemia on endothelial function in type 1 diabetes. / Ceriello, Antonio; Esposito, Katherine; Ihnat, Michael; Thorpe, Jessica; Giugliano, Dario.

In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 94, No. 8, 08.2009, p. 2751-2756.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ceriello, Antonio ; Esposito, Katherine ; Ihnat, Michael ; Thorpe, Jessica ; Giugliano, Dario. / Long-term glycemic control influences the long-lasting effect of hyperglycemia on endothelial function in type 1 diabetes. In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2009 ; Vol. 94, No. 8. pp. 2751-2756.
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