Long-term intubation and high rate of tracheostomy in COVID-19 patients might determine an unprecedented increase of airway stenoses: a call to action from the European Laryngological Society. European archives of oto-rhino-laryngology : official journal of the European Federation of Oto-Rhino-Laryngological Societies (EUFOS) : affiliated with the German Society for Oto-Rhino-Laryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

Cesare Piazza, Marta Filauro, Frederik G. Dikkers, S. A. Reza Nouraei, Kishore Sandu, Christian Sittel, Milan R. Amin, Guillermo Campos, Hans E. Eckel, Giorgio Peretti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: The novel Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, may need intensive care unit (ICU) admission in up to 12% of all positive cases for massive interstitial pneumonia, with possible long-term endotracheal intubation for mechanical ventilation and subsequent tracheostomy. The most common airway-related complications of such ICU maneuvers are laryngotracheal granulomas, webs, stenosis, malacia and, less commonly, tracheal necrosis with tracheo-esophageal or tracheo-arterial fistulae. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This paper gathers the opinions of experts of the Laryngotracheal Stenosis Committee of the European Laryngological Society, with the aim of alerting the medical community about the possible rise in number of COVID-19-related laryngotracheal stenosis (LTS), and the aspiration of paving the way to a more rationale concentration of these cases within referral specialist airway centers. RESULTS: A range of prevention strategies, diagnostic work-up, and therapeutic approaches are reported and framed within the COVID-19 pandemic context. CONCLUSIONS: One of the most important roles of otolaryngologists when encountering airway-related signs and symptoms in patients with previous ICU hospitalization for COVID-19 is to maintain a high level of suspicion for LTS development, and share it with colleagues and other health care professionals. Such a condition requires specific expertise and should be comprehensively managed in tertiary referral centers.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology
Volume278
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Keywords

  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Societies, Medical
  • Prevention
  • Intensive Care Units
  • Pandemics
  • COVID-19
  • SARS-CoV-2
  • Airway Management/*methods
  • Airway team
  • Constriction, Pathologic/etiology
  • COVID-19/diagnosis/*therapy
  • European laryngological society
  • Intubation injuries
  • Intubation, Intratracheal/adverse effects/*statistics & numerical data
  • Laryngostenosis/*epidemiology
  • Laryngotracheal stenosis
  • Otolaryngologists
  • Otolaryngology
  • Respiration, Artificial/*adverse effects
  • Tracheal Stenosis/*epidemiology
  • Tracheostomy
  • Tracheostomy/adverse effects/*statistics & numerical data

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Long-term intubation and high rate of tracheostomy in COVID-19 patients might determine an unprecedented increase of airway stenoses: a call to action from the European Laryngological Society. European archives of oto-rhino-laryngology : official journal of the European Federation of Oto-Rhino-Laryngological Societies (EUFOS) : affiliated with the German Society for Oto-Rhino-Laryngology - Head and Neck Surgery'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this