Long term 'marine diet' in Eskimos is not associated with altered urinary excretion of total tetranor prostaglandin metabolites

Ettore Zuccato, Gerard Hornstra, Jørn Dyerberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The total urinary excretion of tetranor prostaglandin metabolites, measured as tetranorprostanedioic acid (TPD), was quantified in traditionally living Greenland Eskimos (E) and compared with that in Caucasian Danes (D). TPD excretion (μg/24h) was not significantly different between both groups, neither for males (331 ± 62.4 (E) vs. 331 ± 25.7 (D), mean ± SEM, n = 9 and 10) nor for females (190 ± 31.7 (E) vs. 264 ± 27.4 (D), n = 11 and 10, P2 > 0.05). Since urinary prostaglandin metabolites are thought to reflect the total prostaglandin turnover in vivo, these results suggest that a long-term intake of relatively large amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids of the (n-3) family does not alter total prostaglandin turnover in vivo. This is in contrast to stimulated prostanoid formation in vitro, and thus suggests a different regulatory role of dietary and tissue fatty acids for 'stimulated' and 'basal' prostaglandin production.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)465-477
Number of pages13
JournalProstaglandins
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1985

Keywords

  • dietary fat type
  • marine diet
  • metabolite
  • prostaglandin
  • urine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology

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