Long-Term Outcome of Splanchnic Vein Thrombosis in Cirrhosis

for the IRSVT study investigators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Little is known about the long-term outcome of cirrhotic patients with splanchnic vein thrombosis (SVT). This prospective cohort study aimed to describe the clinical presentation, bleeding incidence, thrombotic events, and mortality in patients with SVT associated with cirrhosis. Methods: Among 604 consecutive patients with SVT enrolled over 2 years, 149 had cirrhosis. Major bleeding, thrombotic events, and all-cause mortality were recorded during a 2-year follow-up. In a subgroup, the degree of recanalization with or without anticoagulation therapy, and the correlation between clinical events and liver disease severity were also investigated. Results: The most common thrombosis sites were the portal (88%) and mesenteric veins (34%). At presentation, 50% of patients were asymptomatic. Anticoagulation was administered to 92/149 patients for a median of 6.5 months. Vessel recanalization was documented in 47/98 patients with a radiological follow-up. Anticoagulation was associated with a 3.33-fold higher of recanalization rate, and a lower recurrent thrombosis rate, while patients with and without anticoagulation experienced a similar rate of major bleeding episodes. Mortality rates were 6.8 per 100 patient-years for patients with thrombosis completely or partially resolving during the follow-up, and 15.4 per 100 patient-years for those with stable or progressing thrombosis. An impact of SVT on survival was only apparent in patients with more advanced liver disease (Child–Pugh B-C). Conclusions: Patients with SVT and cirrhosis have a substantial long-term risk of recurrent thrombotic events, which is reduced by anticoagulation therapy without any increase in bleeding risk. Anticoagulation can improve the likelihood of vessel recanalization, and is associated with a lower risk of death for decompensated patients.

Original languageEnglish
Article number176
JournalClinical and Translational Gastroenterology
Volume9
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1 2018

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Viscera
Veins
Thrombosis
Fibrosis
Hemorrhage
Mortality
Liver Diseases
Mesenteric Veins
Portal Vein
Cohort Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Long-Term Outcome of Splanchnic Vein Thrombosis in Cirrhosis. / for the IRSVT study investigators.

In: Clinical and Translational Gastroenterology, Vol. 9, No. 8, 176, 01.08.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Long-Term Outcome of Splanchnic Vein Thrombosis in Cirrhosis",
abstract = "Introduction: Little is known about the long-term outcome of cirrhotic patients with splanchnic vein thrombosis (SVT). This prospective cohort study aimed to describe the clinical presentation, bleeding incidence, thrombotic events, and mortality in patients with SVT associated with cirrhosis. Methods: Among 604 consecutive patients with SVT enrolled over 2 years, 149 had cirrhosis. Major bleeding, thrombotic events, and all-cause mortality were recorded during a 2-year follow-up. In a subgroup, the degree of recanalization with or without anticoagulation therapy, and the correlation between clinical events and liver disease severity were also investigated. Results: The most common thrombosis sites were the portal (88{\%}) and mesenteric veins (34{\%}). At presentation, 50{\%} of patients were asymptomatic. Anticoagulation was administered to 92/149 patients for a median of 6.5 months. Vessel recanalization was documented in 47/98 patients with a radiological follow-up. Anticoagulation was associated with a 3.33-fold higher of recanalization rate, and a lower recurrent thrombosis rate, while patients with and without anticoagulation experienced a similar rate of major bleeding episodes. Mortality rates were 6.8 per 100 patient-years for patients with thrombosis completely or partially resolving during the follow-up, and 15.4 per 100 patient-years for those with stable or progressing thrombosis. An impact of SVT on survival was only apparent in patients with more advanced liver disease (Child–Pugh B-C). Conclusions: Patients with SVT and cirrhosis have a substantial long-term risk of recurrent thrombotic events, which is reduced by anticoagulation therapy without any increase in bleeding risk. Anticoagulation can improve the likelihood of vessel recanalization, and is associated with a lower risk of death for decompensated patients.",
author = "{for the IRSVT study investigators} and Marco Senzolo and Nicoletta Riva and Francesco Dentali and Kryssia Rodriguez-Castro and Sartori, {Maria Teresa} and Bang, {Soo Mee} and Ida Martinelli and Sam Schulman and Adriano Alatri and Jan Beyer-Westendorf and {Di Minno}, {Matteo Nicola Dario} and Walter Ageno",
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T1 - Long-Term Outcome of Splanchnic Vein Thrombosis in Cirrhosis

AU - for the IRSVT study investigators

AU - Senzolo, Marco

AU - Riva, Nicoletta

AU - Dentali, Francesco

AU - Rodriguez-Castro, Kryssia

AU - Sartori, Maria Teresa

AU - Bang, Soo Mee

AU - Martinelli, Ida

AU - Schulman, Sam

AU - Alatri, Adriano

AU - Beyer-Westendorf, Jan

AU - Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario

AU - Ageno, Walter

PY - 2018/8/1

Y1 - 2018/8/1

N2 - Introduction: Little is known about the long-term outcome of cirrhotic patients with splanchnic vein thrombosis (SVT). This prospective cohort study aimed to describe the clinical presentation, bleeding incidence, thrombotic events, and mortality in patients with SVT associated with cirrhosis. Methods: Among 604 consecutive patients with SVT enrolled over 2 years, 149 had cirrhosis. Major bleeding, thrombotic events, and all-cause mortality were recorded during a 2-year follow-up. In a subgroup, the degree of recanalization with or without anticoagulation therapy, and the correlation between clinical events and liver disease severity were also investigated. Results: The most common thrombosis sites were the portal (88%) and mesenteric veins (34%). At presentation, 50% of patients were asymptomatic. Anticoagulation was administered to 92/149 patients for a median of 6.5 months. Vessel recanalization was documented in 47/98 patients with a radiological follow-up. Anticoagulation was associated with a 3.33-fold higher of recanalization rate, and a lower recurrent thrombosis rate, while patients with and without anticoagulation experienced a similar rate of major bleeding episodes. Mortality rates were 6.8 per 100 patient-years for patients with thrombosis completely or partially resolving during the follow-up, and 15.4 per 100 patient-years for those with stable or progressing thrombosis. An impact of SVT on survival was only apparent in patients with more advanced liver disease (Child–Pugh B-C). Conclusions: Patients with SVT and cirrhosis have a substantial long-term risk of recurrent thrombotic events, which is reduced by anticoagulation therapy without any increase in bleeding risk. Anticoagulation can improve the likelihood of vessel recanalization, and is associated with a lower risk of death for decompensated patients.

AB - Introduction: Little is known about the long-term outcome of cirrhotic patients with splanchnic vein thrombosis (SVT). This prospective cohort study aimed to describe the clinical presentation, bleeding incidence, thrombotic events, and mortality in patients with SVT associated with cirrhosis. Methods: Among 604 consecutive patients with SVT enrolled over 2 years, 149 had cirrhosis. Major bleeding, thrombotic events, and all-cause mortality were recorded during a 2-year follow-up. In a subgroup, the degree of recanalization with or without anticoagulation therapy, and the correlation between clinical events and liver disease severity were also investigated. Results: The most common thrombosis sites were the portal (88%) and mesenteric veins (34%). At presentation, 50% of patients were asymptomatic. Anticoagulation was administered to 92/149 patients for a median of 6.5 months. Vessel recanalization was documented in 47/98 patients with a radiological follow-up. Anticoagulation was associated with a 3.33-fold higher of recanalization rate, and a lower recurrent thrombosis rate, while patients with and without anticoagulation experienced a similar rate of major bleeding episodes. Mortality rates were 6.8 per 100 patient-years for patients with thrombosis completely or partially resolving during the follow-up, and 15.4 per 100 patient-years for those with stable or progressing thrombosis. An impact of SVT on survival was only apparent in patients with more advanced liver disease (Child–Pugh B-C). Conclusions: Patients with SVT and cirrhosis have a substantial long-term risk of recurrent thrombotic events, which is reduced by anticoagulation therapy without any increase in bleeding risk. Anticoagulation can improve the likelihood of vessel recanalization, and is associated with a lower risk of death for decompensated patients.

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