Long-term potentiation of synaptic transmission at the mossy fiber-granule cell relay of cerebellum.

Egidio D'Angelo, Paola Rossi, David Gall, Francesca Prestori, Thierry Nieus, Arianna Maffei, Elisabetta Sola

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In the last decade, the physiology of cerebellar neurons and synapses has been extended to a considerable extent. We have found that the mossy fiber-granule cell relay can generate a complex form of long-term potentiation (mf-GrC LTP) following high-frequency mf discharge. Induction. Mf-GrC LTP depends on NMDA and mGlu receptor activation, intracellular Ca(2+) increase, PKC activation, and NO production. The preventative action of intracellular agents (BAPTA, PKC-inhibitors) and of membrane hyperpolarization, and the correlated increase in intracellular Ca(2+) observed using fluorescent dyes, indicate that induction occurs postsynaptically. Expression. Expression includes three components: (a) an increase of synaptic currents, (b) an increase of intrinsic excitability in GrC, and (c) an increase of intrinsic excitability in mf terminals. Based on quantal analysis, the EPSC increase is mostly explained by enhanced neurotransmitter release. NO is a candidate retrograde neurotransmitter which could determine both presynaptic current changes and LTP. NO cascade blockers inhibit both presynaptic current changes and LTP. The increase in intrinsic excitability involves a raise in apparent input resistance in the subthreshold region and a spike threshold reduction. Together with other forms of cerebellar plasticity, mf-GrC LTP opens new hypothesis on how the cerebellum processes incoming information.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)69-80
Number of pages12
JournalProgress in Brain Research
Volume148
Publication statusPublished - 2005

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

D'Angelo, E., Rossi, P., Gall, D., Prestori, F., Nieus, T., Maffei, A., & Sola, E. (2005). Long-term potentiation of synaptic transmission at the mossy fiber-granule cell relay of cerebellum. Progress in Brain Research, 148, 69-80.